Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - kevinhillman

Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 »
121
 
PRESS RELEASE
7/3/12
 
Prosecutor’s Office Mid-Year Report
By: Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman
             The Prosecutor’s Office remains a busy and productive place halfway through 2012.  The biggest news from my office involves me personally. My National Guard unit has been called to Active Duty and as I write this article, I am currently at Ft. Hood preparing to head out to Kuwait.  However, there should be no interruption in service as my staff remains in place and my chief assistant prosecutor, Ken Clayton, is doing an excellent job as the acting prosecutor.  Ken was the prosecutor in Phelps County for eight years and I have full confidence that he will do a great job for the citizens of Pulaski County.  I have asked the County Commission to use my salary to pay for the additional help in my absence, so there should be no impact on the budget as well.
 
            As of July 1, 2012, we have filed 842 criminal cases this year (not counting traffic cases).  We have collected and disbursed $143,827 in restitution to victims of crimes to date.  We have also collected $17,251 in delinquent taxes to the State of Missouri, which allows both my office and the County to each receive 10% of this collection.  The courts switched to the Fine Collection Center (FCC) for traffic tickets, which is managed at the state level.  As such, I will not know the number of traffic tickets we handled until the end of the year.  However, the traffic docket has always been and remains a busy docket.
 
            One significant improvement we made to the office efficiency this year was the purchase of a new server and all new personal computers for all of the employees.  The best part about this purchase was it was done with no taxpayer dollars being expended.  Instead, we used money paid by offenders from two funds.  The first was the bad check fund that is funded from fees paid by those we have prosecuted for bad checks.  We used this to purchase a new server.  Our old server was so old and slow, we would not have been able to run our case management software any longer.  Our new server allows us to not only run the software but to expand our technology and continue our transition to a paperless office.  In the long run, this will help to save taxpayer dollars by making the office more efficient.
 
            The new desktop and laptop computers were purchased with funds from the County Law Enforcement Restitution Fund (CLERF).  This fund is an additional court cost taxed to many defendants who have been convicted of crimes.  The Sheriff, the Prosecutor, and the Coroner are permitted to use these funds for law enforcement purposes.  A board, made up of community members appointed by the County Commission, oversees the fund and approves any request for funds.  These new computers are running Windows 7 and will last us years into the future.  The laptops we purchased also continued our ability to use technology to make the Prosecutor’s Office more efficient and better handle the continued growing caseload of Pulaski County at the best value to the taxpayer.  These computers were a long overdue needed upgrade and have really improved the efficiency of the office. 
 
            We hosted two new events this year during Crime Victims’ Rights Week to try and bring awareness to victims as well as raise some money for those who help victims of crimes.  The first was a breakfast in honor of Victims of Crime and we had an outstanding speaker who was the victim of abuse as a child shared her experiences.  My office hosted this in conjunction with Kids Harbor, one of the agencies in our county who service crime victims.  The second event we hosted was a benefit golf tournament at the new St. Robert Municipal Golf Course.  I am proud to say that we raised a little over $1200.00 during the event.  We donated the proceeds to Kids Harbor, Genesis House, and my office’s victim advocate program.  My office used the proceeds to purchase furniture to make a kids area for children who must come to court as a witness. I want to thank all who attended or sponsored these events.  With the success we had this year, we hope to make these events a yearly event.
 
            I look forward to returning home in May of next year and getting back to work at the courthouse.  However, I am still proud of what my office has accomplished this year and the progress we have made over my first year and a half in office.  We continue to strive to keep Pulaski County a safe place to live and raise your family and we will continue our policy of aggressively prosecuting criminals.  If you ever have a question or wish to speak with me or any of the members of my staff, please feel free to contact us at 573-774-4770.       
 
 
Please direct all questions to Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney.

122
 
PRESS RELEASE
7/10/12
Four Offenders Sentenced to the Department of Corrections

Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney announces that in Circuit Court action over the last month, four offenders were sentenced to terms of imprisonment in the Department of Corrections.  The seven are:
 
The first defendant was Demontra Hatfield of St. Robert.  Mr. Hatfield was on probation for a charge of Robbery.  After failing to comply with the terms and conditions of his probation, the Prosecutor’s filed a motion to revoke his probation.  Judge Storie granted the motion and sentenced the defendant to ten years in the Department of Corrections.  The St. Robert Police Department investigated the original case.
 
The second defendant was Jerry Geiselhart of Dixon.  Mr. Geiselhart was on probation for Stealing.  After failing to comply with the terms and conditions of his probation, the Prosecutor’s Office filed a motion to revoke his probation.  Judge Storie granted the motion and sentenced the defendant to five years in the Department of Corrections.  The St. Robert Police Department investigated the original case.
 
The third defendant was James Johnson of Dixon.  Mr. Johnson was on probation for Endangering the Welfare of a Child.  After failing to comply with the terms and conditions of his probation, the Prosecutor’s Office filed a motion to revoke his probation.  Judge Wiggins granted the motion and sentenced the defendant to five years in the Department of Corrections.  The Dixon Police Department investigated the original case.
 
The fourth defendant was Charles Lariver of Fort Leonard Wood.  Mr. Lariver pled guilty to two counts of possession of methamphetamine.  Judge Storie sentenced the defendant to two five year sentences to run concurrent with one another in the Department of Corrections.  He is eligible for treatment while in the Department of Corrections.  These cases were investigated by the St. Robert Police Department and the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department.
 
“These cases reflect our continued tough stance on those offenders who cannot meet the terms and conditions of their probation.  If they cannot follow the rules, they need to go to prison and we will continue this policy,” said Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman.  “I want to thank our law enforcement professionals for working hard to keep Pulaski County safe.  These cases are a result of their hard work.”
 
The cases were prosecuted by Assistant Prosecuting Attorneys Ken Clayton, Laura Kriebs, Dean Matthews, and Bill Hardwick.
 
Please direct all questions to Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney.

123
Mandate is a fancy word for a court order.  It depends on what they ordered.  If it says affirmed, then it means the conviction and sentence stands.  If it says reversed, then they might get a new trial or be released.  The word mandate by itself means little unless you know what the court mandated.  I hope that helps.

Kevin

124
Remember, my list is not current for operational reasons. It is usually 1-2 weeks behind so the bad guys don't know the good guys are looking for them.

125
First, the question about the parole board.  That is something the state legislature would have to change so those folks running for that position need to be informed.  Trust me, the prosecutors in this state to include myself have lobbied for changes.  However, until the fiscal situation changes, I doubt there will be any more prison space built so the situation will stay the same.  That's why on the local level we are doing things like Drug Court and Veterans Court to try and help here in our community.


On this specific case, yes, his sentence can and will likely be executed for the case he is on probation for.  My office will file a motion to revoke and this new arrest will be grounds for it.  As to the parole case, the board could have revoked his parole and they did not for some reason.  Again, I have no control or input as to parole, it comes down from the state.


If I recall the specifics of this case in which he pled, it was an older case that needed to be moved.  My judgment call was it was not worth a trial, and several thousand dollars in costs to the taxpayers to get a conviction, get a sentence, only to have him paroled again because it is a drug crime.  I figured he would screw up and we would do a probation revocation and then we would send him up.  The formula the parole board uses takes into account if they come in on a probation revocation.  It ups the amount of time they have to serve.  So basically I gave him the rope, and not surprisingly he has hung himself. 


I agree the system is flawed, and it frustrates the hell out of me.  However, I have to play by the rules I am given  and I try to get the best bang for the buck I can with what tools I have.  I hope that explains some of the process. 


P.S.  By the way, we get used to seeing the same people all the time that we joke that they must have frequent flyer miles with the parole board that gets them out early.

126
One short answer is the unelected parole board.  In my first year and a half as prosecutor, I can't tell you how many times we have sent people up for 5 or 7 years only to see them again on a new charge 5 months later. I then find out they were paroled.  The parole board usually will not revoke their parole until they get a new conviction, not just an arrest.  It is incredibly frustrating.  I have asked why this is and the answer I always get is no room in prison.  Thus, for every murderer that checks in, they have to release a drug crime defendant. Mr. Ellzey should still be in prison, but again the local law enforcement, prosecutor, and judge have to deal with him because the state cannot.


 author=pulaskiivoter link=topic=29691.msg265357#msg265357 date=1341371540]
Sheriff, I would like to know why this guy Ellzey is not in jail  According to casenet in 2008 he plead guilty to assault on LE  in 2008 he plead guilty to a felony, got probation and in 2010 he was sent to prison for 4 years. 18 months later he get picked up for driving without a license, but just gets a fine.  He should have been in jail.  The in December of 2011 he pleads guilty to Distribution of drugs and GETS PROBATION.  He should have still been in jail. 


So at 21 he has been convicted of 2 felonies and two misdemeanors.  His fourth conviction in 4 years for what I consider the most serious offense gets him probation?  I don't understand.


Looks to me like even if LE does a good job, the judges just go and let them out.  Any insight?


[/quote]

127
PRESS RELEASE
6/11/12

Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney, announces that today in the Circuit Court of Pulaski County, Cody Willcoxson was sentenced to two terms of thirty years confinement in the Department of Corrections, to run concurrently, on the charges of Assault on a Law Enforcement officer, class A Felonies. Mr. Willcoxson had pled guilty to the charges in April.  He still faces a number of serious charges arising from this same incident in Phelps County.

These charges are a result of an incident that occurred on May 12, 2011.  The suspect was involved in a car chase through Ft. Leonard, St. Robert and then along Interstate 44. While traveling at speeds in excess of 100 miles per hour Mr. Willcoxson was using a high powered rifle to shoot at officers that were in pursuit. Chief Curtis Currenton and Officer Trenton Herr pursued the vehicle from St. Robert, Missouri to Rolla, Missouri where Chief Currenton’s patrol car was disabled by the shots fired by Mr. Willcoxson.  Officer Herr pursued Mr. Willcoxson on to the Missouri University Science and Technology Campus where Mr. Willcoxson’s vehicle struck a barrier and was disabled.  Mr. Willcoxson then fled on foot and was later apprehended after a several hour man hunt. Mr. Willcoxson admitted to being under the influence of methamphetamine at the time of this incident.

“I want to thank Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Ken Clayton for his outstanding skills as an attorney to achieve the maximum sentence in this case. I also want to thank Chief Curtis Currenton and Officer Trenton Herr for their selfless acts of courage and bravery under fire. Let this send a message that Pulaski County will not tolerate negligent disregard for the public, nor acts of violence against those sworn to protect the citizens of this county.” said Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman.

The Prosecutor’s Office wishes to thank the St. Robert Police Department, Rolla Police Department and all other law enforcement agencies involved for their quick response and apprehension of this subject. We will continue to work hard to bring offenders to justice for their crimes and keep Pulaski County a safe place to live.

Please direct all questions to Kenneth G. Clayton, Pulaski County Assistant Prosecuting Attorney.

128
Business Opinion / Re: Deborah Hooper's now a defense lawyer
« on: June 04, 2012, 10:49:02 AM »
I am not aware of any mass dismissal of cases in January 2011 or 2012.  There was a dismissal docket of old cases in December 2010 I believe before I took office.  Can you let me know where you got the statistics and I can tell you what they were. However, I did not do a mass dismissal.


Kevin

129
 
PRESS RELEASE
5/29/12
Five Offenders Sentenced to the Department of Corrections

Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney announces that in Circuit Court action over the last several weeks, five offenders were sentenced to terms of imprisonment in the Department of Corrections.  The five defendants are:

1.  William Alexander of Dixon.  Mr. Alexander was on probation as a result of a plea of guilty to a charge of forgery.  Mr. Alexander also was charged in a new case with receiving stolen property.  Mr. Alexander pled guilty to the charge of receiving stolen property and Judge Colin Long sentenced him to five years in the Department of Corrections.  As a result of his plea of guilty and a motion to revoke his probation filed by the Prosecutor’s Office, Judge Mary Sheffield revoked his probation and sentenced him to five years in the Department of Corrections as well.  These cases were investigated by the Waynesville Police Department and the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department. 

2.  Bruce Bagley of St. Robert.  Mr. Bagley was on probation for kidnapping and he absconded from probation.  He was subsequently arrested in Arizona and he fought extradition to Missouri.  The Prosecutor’s Office filed a motion to revoke his probation and requested a governor’s warrant in order to extradite him from Arizona.  Governor Nixon issued that warrant and Governor Brewer of Arizona ordered Mr. Bagley back to Missouri.  Judge Sheffield granted the Prosecutor’s motion to revoke probation and sentenced the Defendant to ten years in the Department of Corrections. The Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department investigated the original case and assisted with the extradition from Arizona.

3.  Derrick Redden of Waynesville.  Mr. Redden was on probation for fraudulent use of a credit device.  The Defendant violated the terms and conditions of his probation and the Prosecutor’s Office filed a motion to revoke his probation.  Judge Sheffield granted the motion and sentenced the Defendant to five years in the Department of Corrections.  The Waynesville Police Department investigated the original case.

4.  John Sandifer of Waynesville.  Mr. Sandifer was on probation for burglary.  After violating the terms and conditions of his probation, the Prosecutor’s Office filed a motion to revoke his probation.  Judge Sheffield granted the motion and sentenced Mr. Sandifer to five years in the Department of Corrections.  Mr. Sandifer is eligible for treatment while in the Department of Corrections.  The Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department investigated the original case.

5.  Melissa Wright of Richland.  Ms. Wright was on probation for possession of a controlled substance.  After testing positive for controlled substances while on probation, the Prosecutor’s Office filed a motion to revoke her probation.  Judge Wiggins granted the motion and sentenced the Defendant to five years in the Department of Corrections.  The Defendant is eligible for treatment while in the Department of Corrections.  The Lake Area Narcotics Enforcement Group investigated the original case.

“These cases continue to show that if you are given a second chance on probation and fail to follow the rules, there will be repercussions.  As the Bagley case shows, we will track you down and bring you back to Pulaski County to answer for your crime no matter where you run,” said Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman.  “I am grateful to all the law enforcement officers in multiple states who worked together to bring him back from Arizona and to our local law enforcement officers for their hard work in all of these cases.”

The cases were prosecuted by Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman and Assistant Prosecuting Attorneys Ken Clayton, Laura Kriebs, Dean Matthews, and Bill Hardwick.


Please direct all questions to Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney.

130
Great deputies who work hard and their promotions are well deserved!

131
PRESS RELEASE
4/24/12

Charles Brent Wagoner Pleads Guilty and is Sentenced to a 25 Year Sentence for Voluntary Manslaughter and Armed Criminal Action

Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney announces that Charles Brent Wagoner of Dixon, Missouri, pled guilty today to Voluntary Manslaughter and Armed Criminal Action as a result of the shooting and death of Roy “Rex” Monroe on March 2, 2011 outside of Dixon.  Mr. Monroe’s body was found laying next to the railroad tracks near the home he shared with Mr. Wagoner. 

Pursuant to the plea agreement in this case, Mr. Wagoner was sentenced today by Judge Greg Warren to a sentence of twenty five years in prison.  Specifically, Judge Warren sentenced him to fifteen years in the Department of Corrections on the Voluntary Manslaughter charge and ten years in the Department of Corrections on the Armed Criminal Action charge, consecutive, for a total sentence of twenty-five years in the Department of Corrections.

“It is my hope that this significant sentence of imprisonment will bring some closure for the family of the victim.  I also hope this sentence serves notice on criminals that those who commit crimes will be held accountable in Pulaski County,” said Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman.

This case was prosecuted by Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman.

Please direct all questions to Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney.

132
With modern technology and help from my staff, I'll still be keeping you informed!  If not for some reason, yes we will still be putting info out.

133
She will get some credit, but I am not sure how much.  DOC computes it.

134
Treatment option is 120 days in DOC treatment program at prison in Fulton for males  I think females go to Vandalia.  If they are not sucessful, they serve remainder of their term.  If they are sucessful and judge lets them out, then they go back on probation with the remainder of the term hanging over their heads.

135
That's why I asked for 12 years on her case, but I am not the judge.  However, he explained to me his reasoning and I understand.  The Gilbert case had a lot of issues all over the map and it will be one I remember for a long time. 
The guy with the weed....he would not be in prison today if he had simply followed probation.  Remember, he got probation first and then screwed up.

136
Keep in mind that in order to have a felony level of marijuana, it has to be a lot.  Usually, that means that the offender is selling it and not just using it.  So, I think the correct statement would be Judge Sheffield dislikes stoners who also sell dope to other stoners and who can not handle being on probation. :)

137
 
PRESS RELEASE
4/17/12
Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman Ordered to Active Duty in the Missouri Army National Guard for Deployment to Kuwait

Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney announces that he has been ordered to active duty in the Missouri Army National Guard beginning in early May for a deployment to Kuwait later this summer.  Mr. Hillman serves as the Command Judge Advocate for the 35th Combat Aviation Brigade (CAB).  The 35th CAB has been ordered to active duty with training at Fort Leonard Wood, Fort Hood, and then deployment to Kuwait for approximately nine months.

“As a member of the National Guard, I have always had a contingency plan in place in case this happened,” said Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman.    “We have initiated that plan and everything is in place to ensure that the services of the Prosecutor’s Office are not interrupted while I am away.”

Mr. Hillman has requested that the County Commission grant him a military leave of absence, which they have.  In addition, Mr. Hillman has requested that pursuant to Missouri law, the Presiding Judge appoint an acting prosecutor.  Mr. Hillman recommended that his chief assistant prosecutor, Ken Clayton, be appointed to the position.  Judge Storie agreed with that suggestion and Mr. Clayton has been appointed.  In addition, the Commission last year authorized an additional assistant prosecutor position in the event of this deployment, and that position is currently filled. Finally, Mr. Hillman has requested that except for the pay required under the military leave statutes, that his pay be used to fund these additional positions.

“I have full faith and confidence in Ken Clayton’s abilities as the acting prosecutor,” said Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman.  “Ken served as the elected prosecutor in Phelps County for eight years and has worked in my office for the last year and a half.  His experience and knowledge have proved invaluable to the office for the last year and half and I know he will lead the office well in my absence.  I do not expect that the citizens of Pulaski County to notice any change in the level of service my office provides while I am away.”

“I am very proud in what my office has been able to accomplish over the last year and a half.  I expect that this progress will continue while I am away and have full faith in my staff.  The best move I made in my first year in office was surrounding myself with very good employees and assistant prosecutors who work hard everyday to bring justice to Pulaski County.  I hope that you will support them, my family, and all of Pulaski County law enforcement over the next year.  I want to thank the County Commission, the Judges, the Circuit and County Clerks’ Offices, and all the law enforcement agencies who have worked with me to ensure that this is a smooth transition.  I am proud to serve my country but look forward to getting back to my home and family and once again serving the citizens of Pulaski County,” stated Kevin Hillman.


Please direct all questions to Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney.

138
 
PRESS RELEASE
4/17/12
Seven Offenders Sentenced to the Department of Corrections

Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney announces that in Circuit Court action over the last two weeks, seven offenders were sentenced to terms of imprisonment in the Department of Corrections.  The seven are:

The first defendant was Brian Hay of Waynesville, Missouri.  Mr. Hays was on probation for Endangering the Welfare of a Child.  After failing to complete the terms and conditions of his probation, the Prosecutor’s Office filed a motion to revoke his probation.  Judge Storie granted the motion and sentenced Mr. Hays to four years in the Department of Corrections.  The Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department investigated the original case.

The second offender was John Bastean of Dixon, Missouri.  Mr. Bastean entered a plea of guilty to the possession of more than 35 grams of marijuana.  Judge Sheffield sentenced Mr. Bastean to seven years in the Department of Corrections, with a treatment option.  The case was investigated by the Waynesville Police Department.

The third defendant was Candice Harden of Richland.  Ms. Harden pled guilty to felony DWI.  Judge Storie sentenced her to four years in the Department of Corrections, with a treatment option.  This case was investigated by the St. Robert Police Department.

The fourth defendant was Daniel Butler of St. Robert.  Mr. Butler pled guilty to burglary.  Judge Storie sentenced Mr. Butler to three years in the Department of Corrections.  This case was investigated by the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department.

The fifth offender was Sarah Plemmons of Richland, Missouri.  Ms. Plemmons was on probation for forgery and failed to follow the terms and conditions of her probation.  The Prosecutor’s Office filed a motion to revoke her probation and Judge Storie granted the motion.  Judge Storie revoked her probation and sentenced her to four years in the Department of Corrections with a treatment option.  The original case was investigated by the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department.

The sixth defendant was Derrick Redden of Waynesville, Missouri.  Mr. Redden was on probation for burglary.  After failing to follow the terms and conditions of his probation, the Prosecutor’s Office filed a motion to revoke his probation.  Judge Storie granted the motion and sentenced the defendant to five years in the Department of Corrections.  The Waynesville Police Department investigated the case.

The seventh offender was Ryan Maness of Richland, Missouri.  Mr. Maness was on probation for felony stealing.  After failing to comply with the terms and conditions of his probation, the Prosecutor’s Office filed a motion to revoke his probation.  Judge Storie granted the motion and sentenced the defendant to five years in the Department of Corrections.  The original case was investigated by the Richland Police Department and Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department.

“Once again, the hard work of law enforcement in Pulaski County is paying off with offenders being taken off the street and sent to the Department of Corrections.  We continue to take a tough stand on probationers who do not follow the terms and conditions of their probation and they can expect that to continue,” said Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman. “Probation is a second chance, and if a person cannot comply with the terms of probation, they need to go to prison.”

The cases were prosecuted by Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman and Assistant Prosecuting Attorneys Ken Clayton, Laura Kriebs, Dean Matthews, and Bill Hardwick.



Please direct all questions to Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney.

139
 
PRESS RELEASE
4/17/12
Ashley Gilbert Sentenced to Eight Years for Voluntary Manslaughter
Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney announces that Ashley Gilbert was sentenced yesterday by Judge Tracy Storie to eight years in the Department of Corrections for her role in the May 2009 death of David Blankenship in Dixon.  Last month, Gilbert pled guilty to Voluntary Manslaughter as part of a plea agreement with the Prosecuting Attorney.  In exchange for her plea of guilty, the Prosecuting Attorney agreed to reduce the charge from murder in the second degree to voluntary manslaughter, and recommend a sentence of twelve years. 

However, the plea was what is known as an open plea, meaning the judge had discretion as to the length of the sentence.  The Board of Probation and Parole then conducted a sentencing assessment report (SAR), and provided that to the judge.  The SAR contained a recommendation of a six year sentence.  After reviewing the SAR and conducting a sentencing hearing at which evidence from the victim’s family and the defendant’s family was presented and both attorneys made recommendations and arguments, Judge Storie ordered an eight year sentence.  Judge Storie based this decision on the fact that Gilbert’s co-defendant, Robert Fortner, was also sentenced to eight years in this case.

“While I argued for a twelve year sentence and thought that it was appropriate, I understand Judge Storie’s decision.  He had to weigh all of the factors in this case, including the victim’s family’s statements, and I believe he did,” said Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman.  “I am happy that this very difficult case resulted in a conviction and a sentence in the Department of Corrections.  I was appalled to see this defendant freely walking the streets of Dixon after this incident and I am happy that she had to answer for her role in the killing of another human being.”

This case was prosecuted by Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman and Assistant Attorney General Ted Bruce.  The case was investigated by the Dixon Police Department and the Division of Drug and Crime Control of the Missouri State Highway Patrol.

Please direct all questions to Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney.

140
The Prosecutor's Office will be hosting 2 events during Victim's Rights Week this year.  The first is  breakfast on April 25 @ 7:00 am at the Hampton Inn in St. Robert.  The second is a beneft golf tournament at the new Par 3 course in St. Robert on April 27th @ 2 pm.  Proceeds will benefit victim service groups here in Pulaski County.  I have attached flyers to this post for those that are interested.

141
 PRESS RELEASE4/9/12Stacy Powell Sentenced to a 25 Year Sentence for Voluntary Manslaughter and Armed Criminal Action
Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney announces that Stacy Powell, who previously pled guilty to Voluntary Manslaughter and Armed Criminal Action as a result of the shooting and death of her husband in 2008, was sentenced today by Judge Tracy Storie to a sentence of twenty five years in prison.  Specifically, Judge Storie sentenced her to fifteen years in the Department of Corrections on the Voluntary Manslaughter charge and ten years in the Department of Corrections on the Armed Criminal Action charge, consecutive, for a total sentence of twenty-five years in the Department of Corrections.
 
“It is my hope that this significant sentence of imprisonment will bring some closure for the family of the victim.  I also hope this sentence serves notice on criminals that those who commit crimes will be held accountable in Pulaski County,” said Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman.

This case was prosecuted by Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman.
 
Please direct all questions to Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney.

142
It happened in 2008 but was discovered later as the guardianship and probate process played out.  It was then reported to law enforcement.

143
Before the question is asked, you will not see this case on my press release.  The reason is that one of my assistant prosecutors is a key witness in the case.  She, along with another local attorney who got involved in the guardianship case involving these victims, notified the authorities of what was happening.  Since she is a witness, I asked the Phelps County Prosecutor to handle the case as a special prosecutor.  This is part of our ongoing agreement to handle these cases between the counties at no cost to either county and thus, the taxpayers.

144
PRESS RELEASE
4/4/12

Cody Willcoxson Pleads Guilty to Two Counts of Assault on a Law Enforcement Officer in the First Degree As a Result of May 2011 Incident Involving High Speed Chase from Fort Leonard Wood to Rolla

Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney announces that Cody Willcoxson has pled guilty to two counts of Assault on a Law Enforcement Officer as a result of the high speed chase with shots fired that took started on Fort Leonard Wood and went to Rolla.  These pleas are only related to the incidents that took place in Pulaski County and Mr. Willcoxson still faces numerous other charges in Phelps County.

The plea agreement in this case is simply that in exchange for Mr. Willcoxson entering a plea of guilty to these two charges, which as Class A felonies were the most serious of the charges.  In exchange, the Prosecuting Attorney agreed to dismiss the other lesser charges related to the Pulaski County portion of the chase.  The Board of Probation and Parole will now conduct a Sentencing Assessment Report to provide to Judge Storie.  Sentencing will take place on June 11, 2012.  Mr. Willcoxson faces two potential life sentences as a result of these pleas.

“I am happy to see this case brought to a close with Mr. Willcoxson facing a long, long time in prison.  His actions on that day put the lives of not only the law enforcement officers who were simply doing their job, but the lives of many innocent people in danger,” said Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman.  “After consulting with the officers who were the victims in this case, and with the many additional charges pending in Phelps County, I believed it best to close out the Pulaski County cases with these significant convictions and the lengthy sentences that are likely to follow.  I believe that this case sends a message that conduct that puts law enforcement officers and innocent citizens in danger will not be tolerated.”

The Prosecutors Office would like to thank the St. Robert Police Department and specifically Chief Curtis Curenton and Officer Trenton Herr for their bravery during this incident and their hard work afterwards with the investigation helping to ensure these convictions. 

Please direct all questions to Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney.

145
Yes, replace he with she and the same applies. Sorry.

146
You could, but they would still have to serve him.  If he is an absconder from probation, he probably has a warrant for his arrest.  My guess is he will be picked up sooner or later.

147
I don't think that is right because she was arrested on the scene and has never been out of custody.  She might have received benefit, but I don't think she ever had any cosmetic surgery in our jail.  You must be thinking of another case.

148
PRESS RELEASE
3/26/12

Stacy Powell Pleads Guilty to Voluntary Manslaughter and Armed Criminal Action, with an Agreement for a 25 Year Sentence

Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney announces that Stacy Powell, who was originally charged with murder in the first degree and armed criminal action, entered a plea to voluntary manslaughter and armed criminal action today pursuant to a plea agreement with the Prosecutor’s Office before Judge Tracy Storie. In exchange for her plea of guilty, the Prosecuting Attorney filed the reduced charge of Voluntary Manslaughter along with the Armed Criminal Action charge and agreed to recommend the maximum sentence of fifteen years on the Voluntary Manslaughter charge and ten years on the Armed Criminal Action charge, consecutive, for a total sentence of twenty-five years in the Department of Corrections.”

“Four years to the day of the death of Mr. Powell, I am happy that we are finally able to bring this case to a close with a conviction and a significant sentence of imprisonment,” said Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman.  “We consulted with the family, the police officers who investigated this case, the Assistant Attorney General who was assigned to assist us in this case, as well as my own team of prosecutors prior to this deal.  We concluded that if we had gone to trial, we would have likely received a similar sentence and this deal assured a conviction.  In addition, many of the witnesses are now located throughout the United States and across the world and the expense to the taxpayer in a trial would have been significant.  However, the main concern was that the defendant be required to answer for her actions on that day and we believe this sentence will make her do just that.”

“I want to thank past and current Deputies Don Hayden, Dianne Hayden, Mike Denny, Brandon Robertson, Bill Anderson, Jim Beasley, Coroner Mikel Hartness, and Sheriff J.B. King for their hard work in investigating this case.  I also want to thank the Missouri State Highway Patrol who assisted with the initial investigation and the Highway Patrol crime lab who did extensive testing in regards to this case.  I also wish to thank Elizabeth Bock of the Attorney General’s Office for her assistance and my entire staff for their hard work in this case.  Finally I want to thank the family of Mr. Powell who cooperated with us through this entire difficult process,” said Prosecuting Attorney Kevin Hillman. “It takes the hard work of all of these law enforcement officials to bring a tough case like this to a close and I appreciate their teamwork and dedication.”




Ms. Powell will be sentenced on April 9, 2012, to allow the family of the victim to arrive from across the county to give victim impact statements to the Court during that hearing.  Although she could be sentenced to life imprisonment, it is likely the Court will accept the plea agreement in this case and sentence her to twenty five years in the Department of Corrections.

Please direct all questions to Kevin Hillman, Pulaski County Prosecuting Attorney.

149
Yes, anytime she has served on the current charge will count by operation of law.  Anyone, including repeat offenders, are eligible for parole at some point in their sentence.  It is a complex formula and up to the parole board and neither I or the judge have any control over it.  I dismissed the escape charge as part of this agreement and it was only a class d felony with a maximum of 4 years.  Even if convicted of that, the time likely would have been served concurrent anyways.
 
Again, I realize this is a not a perfect sentence, but it was not a perfect case.

150
What left a bad taste in my mouth was when Gilbert was let free and had no punishment in 2010.  That was why I refiled the case to see if we could make her answer somehow for what she did.  Remember, major portions of her confession were suppressed by the judge in the first case and I think it would have happened again.  Her codefendant only got 8 years (prior to my taking office) and he was supposed to be the State's star witness and he was completely unreliable.  We did this agreement after consulting with the family.  I wanted to make sure that she at least got punished for this crime in some way and this was the best way to guarantee it.  A trial with the issues in this case would have been a 50/50 proposition at best. Not a perfect result but probably the best we could do with what we had.

Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 »