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Topics - Lepard LLC

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481
National Political Opinion / Ron Paul 2008 on YouTube
« on: July 30, 2007, 02:45:14 PM »
[youtube=425,350]FmKwlE3fO-Y[/youtube] Watch this video.

482
Missouri leads nation in boating while intoxicated arrests
By David Catanese, KY3 News and The Associated Press
 
Click here to download Flash. LAKE OF THE OZARKS, Mo. (AP) - Researchers are studying how the
Missouri Water Patrol conducts sobriety tests and makes arrests at
Lake of the Ozarks.
A California research institute is conducting the study to help
develop a standardized procedure for checking boaters for sobriety
and making arrests.
Missouri is one of only a few states that check boats for
intoxicated drivers. The patrol says nearly all fatal boat mishaps
at the popular lake involve alcohol.
Water patrol Lieutenant Nick Humphrey says Lake of the Ozarks
has led the nation in boating while intoxicated arrests over the
past several years. In 2005, Missouri ranked first in the nation
with a total of 480 arrests.
Several waterways in South Carolina and Lake Havasu in Arizona
are also being studied.

The Lake-Sun Leader: http://www.lakesunleader.com

483
Local News / Stolen Weapons Recovered
« on: July 27, 2007, 08:06:32 PM »
Press Release

Stolen Weapons Recovered

Pulaski County Sheriff J. B. King

July 27, 2007

On July 19, 2007, members of the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department investigated a burglary that had occurred at 14260 Host Drive, Dixon, Missouri. A number of firearms were stolen in this burglary. The investigation in this case continued for several days. As a result of information developed during this investigation on July 24, 2007, Deputies stopped a suspect vehicle and located a stolen firearm in the vehicle. This development led to a request for a search warrant, which was later granted by the Pulaski County Circuit Court.

On July 27, 2007, this search warrant was served at a residence located at 22336 Spruce Road in Waynesville, Missouri. A number of stolen firearms were located during the search. As a result of this investigation a charge of stealing was filed in Pulaski County Circuit Court against Michael E. Holmes, age 25, of 22336 Spruce Road, Waynesville, Missouri. At this time Mr. Holmes has been unable to post an appearance bond and he remains in the Pulaski County Jail.

484
National News / NASA Astronauts drunk?
« on: July 27, 2007, 02:56:03 PM »
NASA shaken by sabotage, drinking claims By MARCIA DUNN, AP Aerospace Writer
 


CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - America's space agency was shaken Thursday by two startling and unrelated reports: One involved claims that astronauts were drunk before flying. The other was news from NASA itself that a worker had sabotaged a computer set for delivery to the international space station.

 
It was just another jolt for an operation that has had a rocky year from the start, beginning with the arrest of an astronaut accused of attacking a rival in a love triangle.

"It's going to shake up the world, I'll tell you that," retired NASA executive Seymour Himmel said of the latest news. "There will be congressional hearings that you will not be able to avoid."

News of the two latest bombshells broke within just a few hours of each other Thursday afternoon.

Aviation Week & Space Technology reported on its Web site that a special panel studying astronaut health found that on two occasions, astronauts were allowed to fly after flight surgeons and other astronauts warned they were so drunk they posed a safety risk.

The independent panel also found "heavy use of alcohol" before launch — within the standard 12-hour "bottle-to-throttle" rule, the magazine reported.

A NASA official confirmed the report contains such details, but said they were from anonymous interviews and not substantiated. The official asked that his name not be used because NASA will discuss the health report on Friday.

The Aviation Week story did not say how long ago the alleged incidents took place, nor did it say whether it involved pilots or other crew members.

At a news conference to discuss the upcoming space shuttle launch set for Aug. 7, NASA's space operations chief was asked repeatedly about the drunken astronaut report.

The manager, Bill Gerstenmaier, would only say that he had never seen an intoxicated astronaut before flight or been involved in any disciplinary action related to that.

But Gerstenmaier had more news. He revealed that an employee for a NASA subcontractor had cut the wires in a computer that was about to be loaded into the shuttle Endeavour for launch.

The subcontractor, which he wouldn't name, contacted NASA 1 1/2 weeks ago, as soon as it learned that another computer had been damaged deliberately, Gerstenmaier said. Had the contractor not discovered the problem, NASA would have uncovered it by testing the computer before launch, Gerstenmaier said. Safety was not an issue, he added.

He refused to speculate on the worker's motive. He also wouldn't say where the sabotage occurred. He said it did not happen in Florida and had nothing to do with an ongoing strike at the Kennedy Space Center by a machinists' union.

NASA hopes to fix the computer in time for launch next month. It's intended to be installed inside the space station to collect data from strain gauges on a major outside beam.

Former shuttle commander Eileen Collins was as stunned as anyone to learn of the astronaut alcohol claims in the upcoming health report.

"I'm anxious to hear more details because this is very out of character from anything I have ever experienced," she said.

Collins worries this will hurt the image of the astronauts, at least in the short term. "I hope people can really look at the good things astronauts do," she said.

Astronaut Jeffrey Williams, who spent six months on the space station last year, said he's never seen or heard of anything like this. As for the effect this may have on astronaut morale, especially so close to a shuttle flight, he said, "We're trained to deal with things so we deal with them without much emotion."

Himmel, who retired in 1981 as associate director for what is now Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, wasn't surprised to learn the information was anonymous.

"Let's face it. Astronauts are a bunch of brothers and sisters, OK, and they'll cover each other's backsides because they're part of the team," he said. "And who knows what the role of the particular ones was to be. If he was just to sit in the middle seat somewhere and just be a passenger, you kind of say, 'Well, gee, I hope he doesn't vomit on the way up.'"

The independent panel reviewing astronaut health and NASA's psychological screening process was created following the arrest in February of former space shuttle flier Lisa Nowak. None of the panel members returned phone calls or e-mails from The Associated Press.

Nowak is accused of attacking the girlfriend of a fellow astronaut — her romantic rival — with pepper spray in a parking lot at Orlando International Airport. Fired by NASA in March, she has pleaded not guilty to charges of attempted kidnapping, battery and burglary with assault.

The scandal was followed by a freak hailstorm that tore into a space shuttle on the launch pad that set back the year's flight schedule. Then there was a shooting at Johnson Space Center in Houston by an employee who ultimately killed himself.

Himmel questions whether any screening or rules could weed out astronauts like Nowak. "I have personal friends who are psychiatrists and they say, 'Look, we don't know what the hell goes on and you can't really evaluate somebody overnight,'" he said.

As for astronauts who might overindulge before flight, if they're former fighter or test pilots, "it's a pretty hard-living bunch and it's a very emotionally intense thing," Himmel said. He said an old NASA colleague who worked closely with test pilots once told him, "Some of these guys are damn near on a razor's edge when they fly and in their home lives.

"The thing is that no matter how hard anybody tries, or no matter what system you devise to preclude something, there's always somebody who will find a way to louse it up," Himmel said. "There's no perfect system."


485
The recent article in the Waynesville Daily Guide that reported on the gasoline use of the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department has generated a lot of interest in the department policy. This article raised a large number of questions that will require a lot of ink to answer. Since I do not want any statements made that are not facts we must first correct the mistakes in the article.

The report on the gasoline use was not an official report from the Sheriff’s Office to the Commission. A member of the County Clerk’s office came over to the office of the administrative employee who handles our gas bills and made copies of the bills and asked a few questions of the employee. I was in Alaska on vacation and had no knowledge of this investigation of the gas bills.

In the chart that accompanied the article the reserve officer with the highest gas expenditure listed is not a reserve officer. He is a paid officer, who fills the one-half officer position that was created by the COPS grant that expired last year. He works 32 hours each two-week period as required to complete the follow up on the grant. The chart is also somewhat misleading in that the reserve Deputy who was listed for $147.02 in gas expense does not have an assigned vehicle and he had to use someone else’s vehicle.

There are only two vehicles in our fleet that get gas mileage figures over 20 miles to the gallon. They are the 2004 Dodge 6-cylinder that I drive and the 2004 Ford 6-cylinder that the civil process server drives. When I took over the department both the Sheriff and the process server had 8-cylinder patrol vehicles assigned to them and neither position requires such power. I moved these cars to the road and bought the 6-cylinder vehicles solely for the better gas mileage. The gas mileage for our 8-cylinder Ford Crown Victoria patrol vehicles during normal use falls somewhere between 15-17 miles per gallon. Excessive requirements in a single shift for code three driving or extensive idle time on the engine at an emergency scene would cut that figure by several miles per gallon.

It is our belief that the Deputies location of residence does not play a major role in their gas expenditure. Factors that we view as keys to the gas consumption of each Deputy are their type of duty assignment, number of inmate transports performed, time spent on reports, investigations, calls for service and routine patrol. Each Deputy is an individual and each has his or her own way of doing business. Some are more aggressive on routine patrol time and log more miles on patrol than other Deputies. This means they will expend more gas money. Some have a harder time writing reports on investigations that they have completed. If they spend additional hours writing reports then they have less gas expense. Our Deputies, assigned to road duty, seem to average about 2100 to 2300 miles per month. The local state Troopers run between 2500-3000 miles per month

Factors beyond the Deputies control such as the number of inmate transports they must complete also add to the mileage totals and gas expense. Most people do not understand that each and every officer we have, including the Chief Deputy and Sheriff, transport inmates many times each month. These round trips to Tuscumbia and Rolla quickly add to the gas expense. We transport inmates every day of the week.

As Sheriff my position is that we must have Deputies living throughout the County for a number of reasons. The major reason is to help with a rapid response to a serious emergency. As law enforcement officers we live in an uncertain world and we must be READY and ABLE to immediately respond to major incidents. If we fail to meet these emergency needs we know that the critics within the community will respond with severe and immediate condemnation of our department. Having a Deputy in each part of the County also means that particular part of the County is patrolled at least twice a day when the Deputy is working. One of the requirements of the COPS grant that we still operate under requires us to follow the concept of “community policing”, which is a fancy phrase for having a police presence throughout the community. I have yet to hear a citizen object to having an officer living in their neighborhood. They view this as a crime reduction program. The bottom line is that we are a COUNTY law enforcement agency and our Deputies should be located throughout the County.

My policy does not differ from that of any other Pulaski County Sheriff over the past 35 years that I have lived in this County. Several months ago when I realized that this was going to become a political issue I enlisted the aid of the Missouri Sheriff’s Association and sent a survey question to all 114 Missouri Sheriffs. My survey request was to determine how many Missouri Sheriff’s Departments did not have a take home car policy. Every response had a take home car policy and nobody had knowledge of any Missouri Sheriff’s Department that did not have take home cars. I also received a number of responses from Sheriff’s whose policy was to allow Deputies to live 30 miles outside of the County and still take home a car.

The Pulaski County budget for the Sheriff’s department lists a single line item titled automobile expense. In our budget this means that every expense for every car is taken from this one budget item. This includes gas, oil, tires, new transmissions, new motors, body repair after a wreck, the $1,000.00 insurance deductible for that wreck and anything else you can spend money on for a car.

In 2004 the previous Sheriff requested $70,000.00 for auto expense and spent $84,915.00 on auto expense. In 2005 that expense went to $101,199. In 2006, I requested $130,000.00 and was given $125,000.00. Our expense for the 2006-year was $115,423.00. For the 2007 budget I requested $130,000.00 for auto expense. The Commission gave me $100,000.00 for auto expense in 2007. At the six-month mark, the end of June 2007,our auto expense stood at $62,669.73. If you extend for the next six months and double that figure you get $125,339.46. This means that my budget estimate of $130,000.00 should be fairly close to the mark for 2007.

We are all familiar with the current high price of gasoline. However another car expense example would be the fact that our cost per tire has risen from approximately $50.00 per tire in 2006 to $75.00 per tire in 2007. This same reasoning applies to every expense connected to an automobile. I do not know of a single auto expense item that has dropped below the 2006 mark.

Bluntly stated it is very hard to meet the demands of an unrealistic budget figure in a rapidly expanding County like Pulaski during a period of time when the economic price of all goods and services has skyrocketed. Especially when the demands for service from the citizens of Pulaski County received by the Sheriff’s Department have also skyrocketed. I have studied the 2007 budget for the Road and Bridge department and they seem to have the same problem. Budget cuts on the expense of critical items and increased demand by the citizens of Pulaski County for the expenditure of those same critical items.

The Daily Guide article contained numerous references to the “excessive” amount of gas money spent by Deputy Durbin who lives in Bland, Missouri. I would like to add a few facts to this point. First from May 12 to June 12, the 30-day period in question, Deputy Durbin not only had his regular days off but also took one day of Holiday. Despite this he worked 189 hours during this period. On May 14th and May 16th he transported a patient to the St. Louis Mental Hospital for a Circuit Court ordered mental evaluation. He also made a number of trips to Tuscumbia and Rolla on other inmate transports. His starting mileage on 5-12-07 was 128,567. His ending mileage on 6-12-07 was 133,724.

During this 30-day period he traveled 5,157 miles. He spent $1,117.00 for gas. I will use a figure of $2.90 cents per gallon for a gas price. This computes to 385 gallons of gas with the average mileage of 13.4 miles per gallon. There are two additional factors that apply to this case. Deputy Durbin is one of our newest Deputies. As such he is an aggressive patroller and he is also driving throughout the county in an effort to learn the roads and so forth.

The Commissioners are not the only people who checked on the gas expense for Deputy Durbin. I also checked the figures in early June and did not like what I saw. As a result of my check, Deputy Durbin and I arrived at an understanding that he would purchase between 20-25 gallons of gas each week at his expense for the patrol vehicle. These personal purchases are logged on his vehicle chart by date, mileage and cost. The receipts are also kept and later given to me. We began this program on June 15, 2007. This was three days after the end date of the Commissioners survey and his personal purchases are not reflected in the expense cited in the Daily Guide report. I will continue to monitor the progress of this arrangement and if necessary make additional adjustments. I might add that Deputy Durbin’s route home takes him through Rolla and as such we assign him many inmate transfers to Rolla on his way home and early morning inmate pickups at Rolla on his way to work. This arrangement works best when he is on day shift.

There are a total of four vehicles operated by our reserve detective unit. These are the oldest cars we have and are in the worst shape. These four cars include one K-9 Drug unit and three Detectives. All of these Deputies are extremely experienced POST certified Deputies and fill a very important slot for us. From 1-1-07 to 5-31-07 the entire reserve Detective unit gave Pulaski County 1, 563 hours of FREE work. Our only real cost is their gas expense.

All Detectives respond to serious crimes on a call out system. All of them do routine patrol work from time to time. All guard inmates at the area hospitals when needed. During the January ice storm their free hours on Patrol and gas expense was welcomed by Pulaski County because it added to the FEMA totals that we turned in for reimbursement. Because this unit operates in a covert and undercover mode at times I am reluctant to discuss in detail what they do accomplish. However I would point out one example that occurred in the fall of 2005 when we had a double shooting victim incident just outside of Waynesville with a possible hostage inside the house. This was an all Deputies needed situation. But while it was in progress we also had a child abuse murder along with an armed robbery near the Mo. 28 overpass. Our entire reserve Detective unit was called out that night and all three cases were cleared by arrest within 48 hours. The Detective unit played a major role in the murder case and armed robbery case. They assisted with the hostage standoff.

At this point I hope that all Citizens of this County understand that I do attempt to track the cost of doing business for the Sheriff’s Department and strive to obtain the biggest bang for each taxpayer dollar that I can achieve. I am proud of the fact that in 2005 I came in under budget for the year. I shall continue my effort to make a wise use of taxpayer money with due consideration of the duties we must be ready to perform.

Sheriff J. B. King

486
Sports Opinion / Nike pulls Michael Vicks Shoe Deal.
« on: July 20, 2007, 02:17:07 PM »
Glad to hear it. Nike after many years of being cruel to its factory workers, and retailers, has decided to take a stand against animal cruelty. LOL

487
Local News / Elbow Bridge, Kudos to Farnham.
« on: July 20, 2007, 05:55:48 AM »
MoDOT could save Devil’s Elbow bridge, straighten GW Lane route

Published: Tuesday, July 17, 2007 Daily Guide
 
 
Darrell Todd Maurina Daily Guide

While high fuel prices are rapidly driving up the cost of road maintenance in Pulaski County, commissioners were glad to hear Monday morning that Commissioner Bill Farnham appears to have succeeded in obtaining approval from the Missouri Department of Transportation’s District 9 region for repairing the historic Devil’s Elbow Bridge.

State financing is only one $250,000 piece of a multi-part financing package totaling $1.46 million that, if successful, would reopen the Devil’s Elbow Bridge to tour bus traffic, prevent further bridge deterioration, and make it possible for drivers to continue traveling the original route of Historic Route 66.

 
Farnham said he was pleasantly surprised after an initial evaluation that wasn’t so positive.

“We were about the lowest-ranked project going in there, but after a 20-minute presentation by (a project engineer) and myself, we walked out feeling pretty good. And about 4 p.m. we got the word that they voted to award us the money,” Farnham said. “(Photos of another bridge rehabilitation project) looked nice and shiny silver, brand-spanking new, and that’s what this bridge will look like after it’s rehabbed. And they’ll be able to raise the weight limit on it so tourist buses can go through.”

488
Music, Bands, Concerts? / Why do I like this song so much?
« on: July 16, 2007, 02:06:10 AM »
Why?

[youtube=425,350]0kg_KCsi6aw[/youtube]

489
World News / Marine: Beating of Iraqis became routine
« on: July 15, 2007, 02:30:41 PM »
Marine: Beating of Iraqis became routine
 


CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. - A Marine corporal testifying in a court-martial said Marines in his unit began routinely beating Iraqis after officers ordered them to "crank up the violence level."

 
Cpl. Saul H. Lopezromo testified Saturday at the murder trial of Cpl. Trent D. Thomas.

"We were told to crank up the violence level," said Lopezromo, testifying for the defense.

When a juror asked for further explanation, Lopezromo said: "We beat people, sir."

Within weeks of allegedly being scolded, seven Marines and a Navy corpsman went out late one night to find and kill a suspected insurgent in the village of Hamandiya near the Abu Ghraib prison. The Marines and corpsman were from 2nd Platoon, Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment.

Lopezromo said the suspected insurgent was known to his neighbors as the "prince of jihad," and had been arrested several times and later released by the Iraqi legal system.

Unable to find him, the Marines and corpsman dragged another man from his house, fatally shot him, and then planted an AK-47 assault rifle near the body to make it appear he had been killed in a shootout, according to court testimony.

Four Marines and the corpsman, initially charged with murder in the April 2006 killing, have pleaded guilty to reduced charges and been given jail sentences ranging from 10 months to eight years. Thomas, 25, from St. Louis, pleaded guilty but withdrew his plea and is the first defendant to go to court-martial.

Lopezromo, who was not part of the squad on its late-night mission, said he saw nothing wrong with what Thomas did.

"I don't see it as an execution, sir," he told the judge. "I see it as killing the enemy."

He said Marines consider all Iraqi men part of the insurgency.

Lopezromo and two other Marines were charged in August with assaulting an Iraqi two weeks before the killing that led to charges against Thomas and the others. Charges against all three were later dropped.

Thomas' attorneys have said he suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury from his combat duty in Fallouja in 2004. They have argued that Thomas believed he was following a lawful order to get tougher with suspected insurgents.

Prosecution witnesses testified that Thomas shot the 52-year-old man at point-blank range after he had already been shot by other Marines and was lying on the ground.

Lopezromo said a procedure called "dead-checking" was routine. If Marines entered a house where a man was wounded, instead of checking to see whether he needed medical aid, they shot him to make sure he was dead, he testified.

"If somebody is worth shooting once, they're worth shooting twice," he said.

The jury is composed of three officers and six enlisted personnel, all of whom have served in Iraq. The trial was set to resume Monday.

490
Religion Opinion / L.A. archdiocese to pay $660M for abuse
« on: July 15, 2007, 01:34:25 PM »
L.A. archdiocese to pay $660M for abuse By GILLIAN FLACCUS, Associated Press Writer
 


LOS ANGELES - Hundreds of people who claim they were abused by clergy affiliated with the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles can expect to be paid more than $1 million each in a $660 million settlement of their lawsuits. The deal, by far the largest settlement in the church's sexual abuse scandal, was reached Saturday, said Ray Boucher, the lead plaintiff's attorney.

 
The archdiocese, America's largest, and the plaintiffs were set to release a statement Sunday morning and hold a news conference Monday, he said.

An anonymous source with knowledge of the deal placed its value at $660 million, by far the largest payout in the church's sexual abuse scandal. The source spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because the settlement had not been officially announced.

The amount, which would average a little more than $1.3 million per plaintiff, exceeded earlier reports that the settlement would be between $600 million and $650 million.

Some Roman Catholic orders — the Servites, Claretians and Oblates — will be carved out of the agreement because they refused to participate, the source said. The settlement also calls for the release of confidential priest personnel files after review by a judge assigned to oversee the litigation, Boucher said.

The settlements push the total amount paid out by the U.S. church since 1950 to more than $2 billion, with about a quarter of that coming from the Los Angeles archdiocese.

It wasn't immediately clear how the payout would be split among the insurers, the archdiocese and several Roman Catholic religious orders. A judge must sign off on the agreement.

The release of the priest documents was important to the agreement, Boucher said, because it could reveal whether archdiocesan leaders were involved in covering up for abusive priests.

"Transparency is a critical part of this and of all resolutions," he said.

Tod Tamberg, a spokesman for the archdiocese, did not immediately return a call seeking comment late Saturday. Previously, he said the church would be in court on Monday.

Plaintiff Steven Sanchez, who was expected to testify in the first trial, said he was simultaneously relieved and disappointed. He sued the archdiocese claiming abuse by the late Rev. Clinton Hagenbach, who died in 1987.

"I was really emotionally ready to take on the archdiocese in court in less than 48 hours, but I'm glad all victims are going to be compensated," he said. "I hope all victims will find some type of healing in this process."

The settlement is the largest ever by a Roman Catholic diocese since the clergy sexual abuse scandal erupted in Boston in 2002. The largest payout so far has been by the Diocese of Orange, Calif., in 2004, for $100 million.

Facing a flood of abuse claims, five dioceses — Tucson, Ariz.; Spokane, Wash.; Portland, Ore.; Davenport, Iowa, and San Diego — sought bankruptcy protection.

The Los Angeles archdiocese, its insurers and various Roman Catholic orders have paid more than $114 million to settle 86 claims so far. The largest of those came in December, when the archdiocese reached a $60 million settlement with 45 people whose claims dated from before the mid-1950s and after 1987 — periods when it had little or no sexual abuse insurance.

Several religious orders in California have also reached multimillion-dollar settlements in recent months, including the Carmelites, the Franciscans and the Jesuits.

However, more than 500 other lawsuits against the archdiocese had remained unresolved despite years of legal wrangling. Most of the outstanding lawsuits were generated by a 2002 state law that revoked for one year the statute of limitations for reporting sexual abuse.

Cardinal Roger Mahony recently told parishioners in an open letter that the archdiocese was selling its high-rise administrative building and considering the sale of about 50 other nonessential church properties to raise funds for a settlement.

A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge overseeing the cases recently ruled that Mahony could be called to testify in the second trial on schedule, and attorneys for plaintiffs wanted to call him in many more.

The same judge also cleared the way for four people to seek punitive damages — something that could have opened the church to tens of millions of dollars in payouts if the ruling had been expanded to other cases.S. church since 1950 to more than $2 billion, with about a quarter of that coming from the Los Angeles archdiocese.

It wasn't immediately clear how the payout would be split among the insurers, the archdiocese and several Roman Catholic religious orders. A judge must sign off on the agreement.

The release of the priest documents was important to the agreement, Boucher said, because it could reveal whether archdiocesan leaders were involved in covering up for abusive priests.

"Transparency is a critical part of this and of all resolutions," he said.

Tod Tamberg, a spokesman for the archdiocese, did not immediately return a call seeking comment late Saturday. Previously, he said the church would be in court on Monday.

Plaintiff Steven Sanchez, who was expected to testify in the first trial, said he was simultaneously relieved and disappointed. He sued the archdiocese claiming abuse by the late Rev. Clinton Hagenbach, who died in 1987.

"I was really emotionally ready to take on the archdiocese in court in less than 48 hours, but I'm glad all victims are going to be compensated," he said. "I hope all victims will find some type of healing in this process."

The settlement is the largest ever by a Roman Catholic diocese since the clergy sexual abuse scandal erupted in Boston in 2002. The largest payout so far has been by the Diocese of Orange, Calif., in 2004, for $100 million.

Facing a flood of abuse claims, five dioceses — Tucson, Ariz.; Spokane, Wash.; Portland, Ore.; Davenport, Iowa, and San Diego — sought bankruptcy protection.

The Los Angeles archdiocese, its insurers and various Roman Catholic orders have paid more than $114 million to settle 86 claims so far. The largest of those came in December, when the archdiocese reached a $60 million settlement with 45 people whose claims dated from before the mid-1950s and after 1987 — periods when it had little or no sexual abuse insurance.

Several religious orders in California have also reached multimillion-dollar settlements in recent months, including the Carmelites, the Franciscans and the Jesuits.

However, more than 500 other lawsuits against the archdiocese had remained unresolved despite years of legal wrangling. Most of the outstanding lawsuits were generated by a 2002 state law that revoked for one year the statute of limitations for reporting sexual abuse.

Cardinal Roger Mahony recently told parishioners in an open letter that the archdiocese was selling its high-rise administrative building and considering the sale of about 50 other nonessential church properties to raise funds for a settlement.

A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge overseeing the cases recently ruled that Mahony could be called to testify in the second trial on schedule, and attorneys for plaintiffs wanted to call him in many more.

The same judge also cleared the way for four people to seek punitive damages — something that could have opened the church to tens of millions of dollars in payouts if the ruling had been expanded to other cases.


491
Local News / Against The Grain guitarist home burns down.
« on: July 09, 2007, 05:35:41 AM »
Today, Ron Foster (ATG lead guitarist) had his home burn down. Please keep Ron, and his family in your prayers in the days to come.

As always, when one of our brothers have tragedy strike, it effects us all. We wish to send all of our prayers and thoughts to Ron during this difficult time.

Watch their site ( http://www.myspace.com/atgrocks  ), for news on an upcoming benefit. (If your in a band and would be interested in playing at the benefit please let them know).

492
Tell us your favorite Joke / Why I Fired My Secretary- a man's story
« on: July 06, 2007, 05:26:55 AM »
Why I Fired My Secretary- a man's story

Two weeks ago, was my forty-fifth birthday, and I wasn't feeling too hot that morning anyway.

I went into breakfast, knowing my wife would be pleasant and say Happy Birthday and probably have a present for me.

She didn't even say Good Morning, let alone any Happy Birthday. I said, well, that's wives for you. The children will remember. The children came into breakfast and didn't say a word.

When I started to the office I was feeling pretty low and despondent. As I walked into my office, my secretary Janet said, "Good Morning, Boss, Happy Birthday." And I felt a little better; someone had remembered.

I worked until noon. About noon Janet knocked on my door and said, "You know it's such a beautiful day outside and it's your birthday, let's go to lunch, just you and me."

I said, "By George, that's the greatest thing I've heard all day. Let's go."

We went to lunch. We didn't go where we normally go; we went out into the country to a little private place. We had two martinis and enjoyed lunch tremendously.

On the way back to the office, she said, "You know, it's such a beautiful day. We don't need to go back to the office. Do we?"

I said, "No, I guess not."

She said, "Let's go to my apartment."

After arriving at her apartment, we had another martini and smoked a cigarette and she said, "Boss, if you don't mind, I think I'll go into the bedroom and slip into something more comfortable."

"Sure," I excitedly replied. She went into the bedroom and in about six minutes, she came out... ... carrying a big birthday cake, followed by my wife and children. All were singing Happy Birthday.

... and there on the couch I sat... ... with nothing on but my socks...

… and *that's* why I fired my secretary

493
State News / MODOT South Central District I-44 closure
« on: June 29, 2007, 07:43:00 PM »
South Central District 

June 25, 2007


MoDOT: I-44 Closed at US 65/Springfield Weekend of July 7-9
(See maps of Alternate routes and Map of City of Springfield below)

MoDOT, District 8, Springfield -- Interstate 44 is scheduled to be closed at Route 65 in Springfield (Mile Marker 82) for up to 52 hours the weekend of July 7-9, the Missouri Department of Transportation said.

A bridge over I-44 must be taken down and removed over the weekend. It will be replaced over the next several months as part of an interchange reconstruction project.

Other state routes through Springfield will be used as relief routes to guide traffic around the project. These include Kearney Street (Route 744) and Glenstone Avenue (Loop 44) between Kearney Street and I-44.

Traffic also may be shifted at times off of I-44 or Route 65 to West Bypass (Route 160), Chestnut Expressway (Loop 44/Business 65) and Kansas Expressway (Route 13).

I-44 is scheduled to be closed at Route 65 at 12 a.m. Saturday, July 7. The contractor doing the work must reopen I-44 by 4:30 a.m. Monday, July 9.

However, MoDOT and its prime contractor on the job, Emery Sapp and Sons of Columbia, are working together to try to reopen I-44 much earlier than the Monday morning deadline.

MoDOT is encouraging local drivers to avoid the interchange and use other streets and roads in the Springfield area.

MoDOT also is urging cross-state drivers, including truckers, to use a detour between Springfield and Rolla that will run south of I-44, posted with "Alternate I-44" signs to keep drivers going in the right direction. The long-distance detour will use Routes 63, 60 and 360.

Drivers in Springfield should expect heavier-than-normal traffic on state routes through town, especially Kearney Street (Route 744) and North Glenstone Avenue.

Heavier-than-normal traffic also may develop at the Route 60/65 interchange on Springfield's southeast side.

MoDOT will have workers on duty round-the-clock to help with traffic control if backups occur. MoDOT and its contractors are coordinating the I-44 closing with law enforcement, fire and ambulance services.

Electronic message boards will be placed in many locations to help drivers find their way.

The MoDOT Customer Service Center will be open 24/7 when the I-44 segment is closed.

During the I-44 closure at Route 65:

Left turns will NOT be permitted in any direction on the Kearney Street bridge over Route 65.
Traffic on I-44 and southbound Route 65 heading east will be directed south to the Division Street (Route YY) bridge over Route 65, across the bridge and north on Route 65 back to I-44.
Westbound I-44 traffic will be directed north to the Valley Water Mill Road bridge over Route 65, across the bridge and south on Route 65 back to I-44. Valley Water Mill Road will be closed on either end of the bridge over Route 65 through the weekend.
If congestion develops at the Route 60/65 interchange, traffic will be diverted to other routes and back to Route 60 or 65 to keep vehicles moving.
The new northbound Route 65-to-westbound I-44 "flyover" ramp will be open to traffic.
Route 65 will be reduced to one lane each direction on the southbound bridge over I-44.
The "Alternate I-44" detour between Rolla and Springfield will be:

Route 63 between Rolla (Mile Marker 186) and Route 60 at Cabool.
Route 60 between Cabool and Springfield.
James River Freeway (Route 60) through Springfield
Route 360 between Springfield and I-44 (Mile Marker 69).
Completion of the $25 million I-44/65 interchange reconstruction project is scheduled for May 2008.

(For more information, call MoDOT in Springfield at 417-895-7600 or toll-free at 1-888-ASK-MoDOT. Or check modot. org .)

Attachments:

Springfield Map

Alternate I-44 Map

 

494
Local News / Federal Search Warrant Served
« on: June 26, 2007, 09:01:10 PM »
Press Release

Federal Search Warrant Served

Pulaski County Sheriff J. B. King

June 26, 2007

During the early morning hours of June 26, 2007, a joint task force of officers from the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department, the St. Robert City Police JETT team and Troopers from the Missouri State Highway Patrol served a Federal Arrest warrant at a residence located at 26587 Ann Street in Swedeborg, Missouri.

A white male subject, Daniel Henderson, age 56, of Swedeborg, Missouri, was taken into custody as a result of the warrant service. The Federal warrant was for a felony violation of the United States code for “felon in possession; unlawful transport of firearms”. The Deputies on the scene of the arrest noted the presence in plain view of numerous items that related to controlled substances and firearms. This information was relayed to the Springfield, Missouri, office of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms. The ATF officers requested a Federal Search warrant which was later granted. A Pulaski County Deputy guarded the residence after it was secured following the arrest of Henderson and remained on the scene until an ATF agent relieved her at 9:30am on June 26, 2007

At 11:00am on June 26, 2007, agents from the ATF, assisted by the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department served the federal search warrant at the residence on Ann Street in Swedeborg. A large number of items were seized that related to the possession of controlled substances. A total of five firearms were also seized.

Additional charges and further information in this case will be handled by the U.S. Attorney’s office in Springfield, Missouri. Daniel Henderson has been transferred from the Pulaski County jail into the custody of the United States Marshals Service.

A white female subject who was at the residence at the time of the first raid was also taken into custody for a 24-hour hold related to the possession of controlled substances. At this time no charges have been filed on her and her identity will not be released.


[attachment deleted by admin]

495
Local News / Federal arrest warrant was served
« on: June 26, 2007, 02:35:11 PM »
Press Release

Federal Arrest Warrant Served

Pulaski County Sheriff J. B. King

June 26, 2007

At 0052H on June 26, 2007, a Federal arrest warrant was served at 26587 Ann Street in Swedeborg, Missouri. Deputies from the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department along with members of the St. Robert JETT team and Troopers from Troop I of the Missouri State Highway Patrol served the warrant.

As a result of the entry into the home the subject who was named in the Federal arrest warrant was taken into custody. Numerous items of evidence were observed in plain view and at this time officers are preparing to seek a Federal search warrant.

This investigation in this case will continue.

496
Local News / The Sheriff’s saturation
« on: June 26, 2007, 05:03:10 AM »
Press release

Result of Special Saturation patrol

Pulaski County Sheriff J. B. King

June 25, 2007

The Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department would like to announce the results of a special criminal saturation patrol that was conducted on June 16th in Pulaski County. The Sheriff’s saturation was held on the same night that the Missouri State Highway Patrol held DWI saturation in Pulaski County.

The Sheriff’s Deputies used a variety of tactics during the evening but one of the main goals of the night was to visit a number of locations where suspicious activity had been reported in the past. These visits were conducted with very little success.

The Deputies made a total of 33 traffic stops with one moving citation and numerous warnings for traffic or vehicle equipment violations. One subject was arrested for driving while revoked and a second subject was arrested for driving while intoxicated. The Deputies also located one subject who had an active felony warrant and arrested him.

The Deputies who participated in the operation made the observation that the traffic count in the target area’s of Big Piney and Dixon dropped to a very low level of activity soon after the operation started. The Deputies who took part in the operation were pleased with the result of the operation.

497
Sneak Peek Sheriff's View / Results of Special Saturation Patrol
« on: June 25, 2007, 08:44:07 PM »
Press release

Result of Special Saturation patrol

Pulaski County Sheriff J. B. King

June 25, 2007

The Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department would like to announce the results of a special criminal saturation patrol that was conducted on June 16th in Pulaski County. The Sheriff’s saturation was held on the same night that the Missouri State Highway Patrol held DWI saturation in Pulaski County.

The Sheriff’s Deputies used a variety of tactics during the evening but one of the main goals of the night was to visit a number of locations where suspicious activity had been reported in the past. These visits were conducted with very little success.

The Deputies made a total of 33 traffic stops with one moving citation and numerous warnings for traffic or vehicle equipment violations. One subject was arrested for driving while revoked and a second subject was arrested for driving while intoxicated. The Deputies also located one subject who had an active felony warrant and arrested him.

The Deputies who participated in the operation made the observation that the traffic count in the target area’s of Big Piney and Dixon dropped to a very low level of activity soon after the operation started. The Deputies who took part in the operation were pleased with the result of the operation.

498
Restaurant Opinion / New additions to our restaurant guide.
« on: June 20, 2007, 07:31:52 PM »
http://www.pulaskicountyweb.com/menu

I have added links to Quiznos and Miller's Grill..

499
Pulaski Enquirer / Pentagons gay bomb video
« on: June 20, 2007, 06:47:24 PM »
[youtube=425,350]CcJu-rOrRu8[/youtube] Video

500
Pulaski Enquirer / This will make you laugh
« on: June 20, 2007, 05:47:12 AM »
[youtube=425,350]x3Rw_3ky-uo&NR=1[/youtube] Video

502
Local News / Proactive Criminal Patrol Saturation
« on: June 14, 2007, 04:41:42 AM »
Press Release
Proactive Criminal Patrol Saturation
Pulaski County Sheriff J. B. King
June 13, 2007


The Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department would like to announce that Deputies from the department will take part in special criminal patrol saturation in Pulaski County during the time frame of June 16 to June 23, 2007. This operation will be conducted in several locations around the county and will have Deputies engaged in a number of proactive steps to locate and deter criminal activity throughout Pulaski County.

The operation will include full time Deputies and reserve Deputies along with members of the detective division. The Sheriff’s Department K-9 corps will also be included in this operation. The Deputies involved in this operation will be volunteers for the special operation and the department will also have the normal number of road Deputies on duty at the same time. The exact time and location of this operation will not be announced. If you have questions or comments about this operation you may contact Lt. Thomas C. Pearson of the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department at 573-774-6196. At the conclusion of this special operation a follow up press release will be issued with the results of the operation.

503
National News / MIT team claims wireless power demo
« on: June 08, 2007, 04:39:07 AM »
MIT team claims wireless power demo By BRIAN BERGSTEIN, AP Technology Writer
 


BOSTON - Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers made a 60-watt light bulb glow by sending it energy wirelessly — from a device 7 feet away — potentially heralding a future in which cell phones and other gadgets get juice without having to be plugged in.

 
The breakthrough, disclosed Thursday in Science Express, the online publication of the journal Science, is being called "WiTricity" by the scientists.

The concept of sending power wirelessly isn't new, but its wide-scale use has been dismissed as inefficient because electromagnetic energy generated by the charging device would radiate in all directions.

One advance was announced last fall, when MIT physics professor Marin Soljacic said he had figured out how to use specially tuned waves. The key is to get the recharging device and the gadget that needs power to resonate at the same frequency — allowing them to efficiently exchange energy.

It's similar to how an opera star can break a wine glass that happens to resonate at the same frequency as her voice. In fact, the concept is so basic in physics that inventor Nikola Tesla sought a century ago to build a huge tower on Long Island that would wirelessly beam power along with communications.

The truly new step, which is what was described in the paper in Science, was that the MIT team carried the concept out. The scientists were able to light up a 60-watt bulb that had "no physical connection" with the power-generating appliance.

"It was quite exciting," Soljacic said. The process is "very reproducible," he added. "We can just go to the lab and do it whenever we want."

The development raises the prospect that we might eliminate some of the clutter of cables in our ever-more electronic world. And if devices can get their power through the air, they might not need batteries and their attendant toxic chemicals.

However, the technology has a ways to go before it becomes practical.

The MIT system is about 40 to 45 percent efficient — meaning that most of the energy from the charging device doesn't make it to the light bulb. Soljacic believes his system needs to get twice as efficient to be on par with charging the chemical batteries in portable gadgets.

Also, the copper coils that transmit the power are about 2 feet wide for now — too big to be feasible for, say, laptops. And the 7-foot range of this wireless handoff could be increased — presumably so that one charging device could automatically power all the gadgets in a room.

Soljacic believes all those improvements are within reach. The next step is to fire up more than just light bulbs, perhaps a Roomba robotic vacuum or a laptop.

Soljacic's team stresses that the "magnetic coupling" process involved in WiTricity is safe on humans and other living things. And in the initial experiments on the light bulb, no harm came to the cell phones, electronic equipment and credit cards in the room — though more research on that is needed.

504
Local News / Press Release
« on: June 02, 2007, 11:49:01 PM »
Press Release

Up Date on Pursuit

Pulaski County Sheriff J. B. King

June 2, 2007

On May 3, 2007, a Pulaski County Deputy attempted to stop a vehicle on Rt. W in the Turkey Ridge area for a traffic violation. The driver avoided the Deputy and fled from the stop. A short pursuit followed for approximately two miles until the driver lost control of his vehicle and overturned off the roadway. Due to his injuries the driver was taken to a hospital. The Missouri State Highway Patrol investigated the accident and issued numerous traffic citations.

The Pulaski County Deputy completed a statement of probable cause and requested a charge of resisting arrest by fleeing. The Pulaski County Prosecutor filed one count of resisting arrest by fleeing, a class D felony, on Shane H. Green, 26899 Raven Lane, Waynesville, Missouri.

On May 26, 2007, at 9:00pm Mr. Green was observed by an off duty Pulaski County Deputy at a business location in Waynesville. The Deputy requested the response of additional officers and Mr. Green was arrested without incident. Green is currently held in the Pulaski County Jail in lieu of a $50,000.00 bond.

505
Local News / Lepard family is having an auction
« on: May 21, 2007, 07:34:43 PM »
http://www.wardenauction.com/wardenauction/pdfs/Auction_05-24-07_Lepard.pdf

There is a link to more details of this auction, it is on Sunset Drive in Waynesville, just park in the field by the big concrete water tower. This Thursday May 24th at 5pm.

506
Local News / Stabbing Press Release JB King
« on: May 12, 2007, 09:46:28 PM »
Press release

Assault First Degree

Pulaski county Sheriff J. B. King

May 11, 2007

On May 9, 2007, a Pulaski County Deputy was dispatched to a residence located at 17347 Bobwhite Road near Crocker, Missouri for a reported assault. Upon arrival the Deputy located a subject who had been stabbed with a knife. After a preliminary investigation at the scene the Deputy requested assistance from the Detective unit of the Sheriff’s Department.

The stabbing incident was determined to be the result of a domestic argument, which expanded to include several members of a family. The victim Joseph E. Neighbors was transported to St. John’s Hospital in Lebanon, Missouri for treatment of four stab wounds. The suspect was arrested at the scene and taken to the Pulaski County jail.

On May 10, 2007, the Pulaski County PA filed one count of Assault in the First Degree on James Matthew Wotherspoon, age50, of Crocker, Missouri. Wotherspoon was arraigned in Pulaski County Circuit Court and the court set a cash only bond of $50,000.00. At present Wotherspoon is being held in the Pulaski County Jail.

507
Music, Bands, Concerts? / Shakira - Don't Bother - Video
« on: May 11, 2007, 01:14:32 AM »
[youtube=425,350]k8oGh5690d4[/youtube] Another one for the men...

508
Music, Bands, Concerts? / Fergie Glamorous Video
« on: May 10, 2007, 11:52:50 PM »
[youtube=425,350]UgX1WLoqCO8[/youtube] Enjoy it guys. LOL

509
That is all my source had to say, it was not signed sealed and delivered, but it looks right now like it will happen.  They did mention that twice now we almost had Applebees, and it fell through.

510
Peruvians Drink Frog Smoothies to Gain Potency

Vendors assure frog juice is good for asthma, anemia, brain activity and, is also used as a powerful aphrodisiac
 LIMA, Peru —  Carmen Gonzalez plucks one of the 50 frogs from the aquarium at her bus stop restaurant, bangs it against tiles to kill it and then makes two incisions along its belly and peels off the skin as if husking corn.

She's preparing frog juice, a beverage revered by some Andean cultures for having the power to cure asthma, bronchitis, sluggishness and a low sex drive.

A drink of so-called "Peruvian Viagra" sells for about 90 cents.

Gonzalez adds three ladles of hot, white bean broth, two generous spoonfuls of honey, raw aloe vera plant and several tablespoons of maca — an Andean root also believed to boost stamina and sex drive — into a household blender.

Then she drops the frog in.

Once strained, the result is a starchy, milkshake-like liquid that stings the throat.

At least 50 customers a day ask for steaming beer mugs of frog juice at Gonzalez's countertop-only restaurant in eastern Lima, and many treat the concoction as their morning — and afternoon — cup of coffee.

Study: Bondage May Make Men Happier Abstinence Programs Not Effective, Study Finds Rebeca Borja, a 53-year-old housewife and mother of five, originally from Lima's central highland city of Huancayo, where the beverage is common, said simply: "It gives you power."


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