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Messages - Lepard LLC

3061
We used to film those meetings, none ever went to a full half day. They average 4 hours a week in meetings, from what I saw. I do believe that there are other things required of their time..

Very simple solution.  On Mondays and Thursdays they all are in a half day.  Well If Ransdell works full day tuesday, Thornesbury works full day on Wednesday and Farhnam works full day friday every day of the week is covered and they can speak directly to the public themselves.  And this way we get a little more for the money they get paid.  They are so concerned about wasted money on fuel, How about the money wasted on them Really figure it out  2 one half days equal 8 hrs.  Multiply the 8 hrs by 52  and you get 416.  Now if they get paid $30,000.oo a year thats 72.12 an hr.  Thats a waste of money for what we get in my book.  Even if they make $25,000.oo thats $60.10 an hr.  So if they worked the new hrs it would be either $36.06 an hr or $30.05 an hr.   I think that is still a damn good paycheck for those three guys.  Imagine if they had to live on the hrly wage that everyone else gets when you figure them up.  Look at Jb.  He makes good money but when you break it down by the Hr he makes crappy pay.  Look at the hrs he puts in and he makes a very low hrly wage especially when you compare it to these three.  Look at what the deputy's make when broke down hrly.  No wonder the commisioners aren't to worried about putting the tax out there,  they get their money so it really doesn't matter.  I have half a mind to bombard them with these comments Thursday morning at the meeting just to see their response.  Bet I wold get removed from the building, of coarse LE would probably be to busy with all their stuff to remove me so I would be safe. 

3062
The crazy thing is. It's nobodys fault that gas prices went up and budgets will be busted. So why try and spread the blame?

3063
Correct.

I believe the next elections for Commissioners (EASTERN & WESTERN) will be in 2008 and the Presiding Commissioner in 2010.

3064
I only see some (Farnham excluded) of the Commissioners as the ones griping about the Sheriff. I take that back, there are some people that I have met, who do not have a clue, that were against him, until I set them straight. Their opinions of what is really going on were so out there, that I was blown away. I believe there are some people who wouldn't "GET" much of anything.

I wonder how many of the people we see griping and moaning about the sheriff and his department will run for sheriff?  I would venture to say very few.  It is much easier to sit behind a computer and run a county than it is to actually be out there running a county.
Good job to the sheriff and deputies.  I thought maybe this board would be different than the last...wrong.

3065
Sad that he has to defend himself from the witch hunt put on by the County Commission.

3066
The recent article in the Waynesville Daily Guide that reported on the gasoline use of the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department has generated a lot of interest in the department policy. This article raised a large number of questions that will require a lot of ink to answer. Since I do not want any statements made that are not facts we must first correct the mistakes in the article.

The report on the gasoline use was not an official report from the Sheriff’s Office to the Commission. A member of the County Clerk’s office came over to the office of the administrative employee who handles our gas bills and made copies of the bills and asked a few questions of the employee. I was in Alaska on vacation and had no knowledge of this investigation of the gas bills.

In the chart that accompanied the article the reserve officer with the highest gas expenditure listed is not a reserve officer. He is a paid officer, who fills the one-half officer position that was created by the COPS grant that expired last year. He works 32 hours each two-week period as required to complete the follow up on the grant. The chart is also somewhat misleading in that the reserve Deputy who was listed for $147.02 in gas expense does not have an assigned vehicle and he had to use someone else’s vehicle.

There are only two vehicles in our fleet that get gas mileage figures over 20 miles to the gallon. They are the 2004 Dodge 6-cylinder that I drive and the 2004 Ford 6-cylinder that the civil process server drives. When I took over the department both the Sheriff and the process server had 8-cylinder patrol vehicles assigned to them and neither position requires such power. I moved these cars to the road and bought the 6-cylinder vehicles solely for the better gas mileage. The gas mileage for our 8-cylinder Ford Crown Victoria patrol vehicles during normal use falls somewhere between 15-17 miles per gallon. Excessive requirements in a single shift for code three driving or extensive idle time on the engine at an emergency scene would cut that figure by several miles per gallon.

It is our belief that the Deputies location of residence does not play a major role in their gas expenditure. Factors that we view as keys to the gas consumption of each Deputy are their type of duty assignment, number of inmate transports performed, time spent on reports, investigations, calls for service and routine patrol. Each Deputy is an individual and each has his or her own way of doing business. Some are more aggressive on routine patrol time and log more miles on patrol than other Deputies. This means they will expend more gas money. Some have a harder time writing reports on investigations that they have completed. If they spend additional hours writing reports then they have less gas expense. Our Deputies, assigned to road duty, seem to average about 2100 to 2300 miles per month. The local state Troopers run between 2500-3000 miles per month

Factors beyond the Deputies control such as the number of inmate transports they must complete also add to the mileage totals and gas expense. Most people do not understand that each and every officer we have, including the Chief Deputy and Sheriff, transport inmates many times each month. These round trips to Tuscumbia and Rolla quickly add to the gas expense. We transport inmates every day of the week.

As Sheriff my position is that we must have Deputies living throughout the County for a number of reasons. The major reason is to help with a rapid response to a serious emergency. As law enforcement officers we live in an uncertain world and we must be READY and ABLE to immediately respond to major incidents. If we fail to meet these emergency needs we know that the critics within the community will respond with severe and immediate condemnation of our department. Having a Deputy in each part of the County also means that particular part of the County is patrolled at least twice a day when the Deputy is working. One of the requirements of the COPS grant that we still operate under requires us to follow the concept of “community policing”, which is a fancy phrase for having a police presence throughout the community. I have yet to hear a citizen object to having an officer living in their neighborhood. They view this as a crime reduction program. The bottom line is that we are a COUNTY law enforcement agency and our Deputies should be located throughout the County.

My policy does not differ from that of any other Pulaski County Sheriff over the past 35 years that I have lived in this County. Several months ago when I realized that this was going to become a political issue I enlisted the aid of the Missouri Sheriff’s Association and sent a survey question to all 114 Missouri Sheriffs. My survey request was to determine how many Missouri Sheriff’s Departments did not have a take home car policy. Every response had a take home car policy and nobody had knowledge of any Missouri Sheriff’s Department that did not have take home cars. I also received a number of responses from Sheriff’s whose policy was to allow Deputies to live 30 miles outside of the County and still take home a car.

The Pulaski County budget for the Sheriff’s department lists a single line item titled automobile expense. In our budget this means that every expense for every car is taken from this one budget item. This includes gas, oil, tires, new transmissions, new motors, body repair after a wreck, the $1,000.00 insurance deductible for that wreck and anything else you can spend money on for a car.

In 2004 the previous Sheriff requested $70,000.00 for auto expense and spent $84,915.00 on auto expense. In 2005 that expense went to $101,199. In 2006, I requested $130,000.00 and was given $125,000.00. Our expense for the 2006-year was $115,423.00. For the 2007 budget I requested $130,000.00 for auto expense. The Commission gave me $100,000.00 for auto expense in 2007. At the six-month mark, the end of June 2007,our auto expense stood at $62,669.73. If you extend for the next six months and double that figure you get $125,339.46. This means that my budget estimate of $130,000.00 should be fairly close to the mark for 2007.

We are all familiar with the current high price of gasoline. However another car expense example would be the fact that our cost per tire has risen from approximately $50.00 per tire in 2006 to $75.00 per tire in 2007. This same reasoning applies to every expense connected to an automobile. I do not know of a single auto expense item that has dropped below the 2006 mark.

Bluntly stated it is very hard to meet the demands of an unrealistic budget figure in a rapidly expanding County like Pulaski during a period of time when the economic price of all goods and services has skyrocketed. Especially when the demands for service from the citizens of Pulaski County received by the Sheriff’s Department have also skyrocketed. I have studied the 2007 budget for the Road and Bridge department and they seem to have the same problem. Budget cuts on the expense of critical items and increased demand by the citizens of Pulaski County for the expenditure of those same critical items.

The Daily Guide article contained numerous references to the “excessive” amount of gas money spent by Deputy Durbin who lives in Bland, Missouri. I would like to add a few facts to this point. First from May 12 to June 12, the 30-day period in question, Deputy Durbin not only had his regular days off but also took one day of Holiday. Despite this he worked 189 hours during this period. On May 14th and May 16th he transported a patient to the St. Louis Mental Hospital for a Circuit Court ordered mental evaluation. He also made a number of trips to Tuscumbia and Rolla on other inmate transports. His starting mileage on 5-12-07 was 128,567. His ending mileage on 6-12-07 was 133,724.

During this 30-day period he traveled 5,157 miles. He spent $1,117.00 for gas. I will use a figure of $2.90 cents per gallon for a gas price. This computes to 385 gallons of gas with the average mileage of 13.4 miles per gallon. There are two additional factors that apply to this case. Deputy Durbin is one of our newest Deputies. As such he is an aggressive patroller and he is also driving throughout the county in an effort to learn the roads and so forth.

The Commissioners are not the only people who checked on the gas expense for Deputy Durbin. I also checked the figures in early June and did not like what I saw. As a result of my check, Deputy Durbin and I arrived at an understanding that he would purchase between 20-25 gallons of gas each week at his expense for the patrol vehicle. These personal purchases are logged on his vehicle chart by date, mileage and cost. The receipts are also kept and later given to me. We began this program on June 15, 2007. This was three days after the end date of the Commissioners survey and his personal purchases are not reflected in the expense cited in the Daily Guide report. I will continue to monitor the progress of this arrangement and if necessary make additional adjustments. I might add that Deputy Durbin’s route home takes him through Rolla and as such we assign him many inmate transfers to Rolla on his way home and early morning inmate pickups at Rolla on his way to work. This arrangement works best when he is on day shift.

There are a total of four vehicles operated by our reserve detective unit. These are the oldest cars we have and are in the worst shape. These four cars include one K-9 Drug unit and three Detectives. All of these Deputies are extremely experienced POST certified Deputies and fill a very important slot for us. From 1-1-07 to 5-31-07 the entire reserve Detective unit gave Pulaski County 1, 563 hours of FREE work. Our only real cost is their gas expense.

All Detectives respond to serious crimes on a call out system. All of them do routine patrol work from time to time. All guard inmates at the area hospitals when needed. During the January ice storm their free hours on Patrol and gas expense was welcomed by Pulaski County because it added to the FEMA totals that we turned in for reimbursement. Because this unit operates in a covert and undercover mode at times I am reluctant to discuss in detail what they do accomplish. However I would point out one example that occurred in the fall of 2005 when we had a double shooting victim incident just outside of Waynesville with a possible hostage inside the house. This was an all Deputies needed situation. But while it was in progress we also had a child abuse murder along with an armed robbery near the Mo. 28 overpass. Our entire reserve Detective unit was called out that night and all three cases were cleared by arrest within 48 hours. The Detective unit played a major role in the murder case and armed robbery case. They assisted with the hostage standoff.

At this point I hope that all Citizens of this County understand that I do attempt to track the cost of doing business for the Sheriff’s Department and strive to obtain the biggest bang for each taxpayer dollar that I can achieve. I am proud of the fact that in 2005 I came in under budget for the year. I shall continue my effort to make a wise use of taxpayer money with due consideration of the duties we must be ready to perform.

Sheriff J. B. King

3067
Sneak Peek Sheriff's View / Re: Sneak Peek Sheriff's View
« on: July 23, 2007, 04:38:35 PM »
The Sheriff’s View #30, Week of July 30 to Aug. 3, 2007

Welcome aboard for another column full of facts, thrills, and chills. I might even throw in an opinion or two this time. I might even discuss the budget in this column. I have learned that taking a vacation has a downside. My office recorder had 21 messages waiting. Dispatch had another ten or so lined up for me and half the people in the County wanted to drop by and visit. But Alaska was worth the trip, why did I return?

I will start this week with the calls for service/case number count. On Saturday afternoon (the 21st) at 1630H we currently stand at 4,726. Last week it was 4,546 and that means we picked up 180 cases this week. Or better-said business as usual in Pulaski County. The recording of these case numbers is a job that we drop on the dispatcher’s head. We have developed an excel spreadsheet that automatically logs in the next number for you and all the dispatcher has to do is fill in a few blanks and make a tick mark on a daily memo sheet.

Speaking of dispatchers we have lost one. It seems that the pay was $2.00 more per hour and the new employer also pays medical benefits for the employee. Since Pulaski County is to poor to offer such benefits we have lost another great worker and are now looking for someone new to train. If you think you can survive in the fast paced world of the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department Dispatch please feel free to call 573-774-6196 to start the application process. If you cannot think fast and multi-task for eight frantic hours in a row do not bother to call. The shifts are not always like that but you better be able to handle the days that do go crazy.

The highlight of this past week was a critical article in the Daily Guide over the gasoline use by our department. I have prepared a written response to this article and given it to Commissioner Farnham for delivery to the Commission on Monday. But to be completely factual, I should say I gave the response to Capt. Cristoffer to deliver to Commissioner Farnham because I will be out of town for several days attending the annual Missouri Sheriff’s Association summer training conference in St Charles, Missouri. You may recall from last year’s column that this is the Sheriff’s training that is required by law and if you miss the training the County Clerk withholds $2,000.00 from your yearly salary. As I said last time they do know how to get a fellow to go to class.

And I am not the only Deputy with training on his/her mind. This past week three of our senior supervisors went to Branson, Missouri, for a free leadership development and problem solving class. The class lasted three days. While three of our Deputies were in this training, two of our reserve Detectives were in the classroom down the hall teaching that particular course. So we had a total of five people that represented the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department in Branson for law enforcement training. I am told that they acted like good little boys and girls while off duty in Branson and none of them saw the inside of the Taney County Jail. Or at least that better be the case because I will see Taney County Sheriff Jimmie Russell in person tomorrow in St. Charles.

Our Deputies have made some serious progress on a couple of burglaries and have located some property they believe will turn out to be stolen. It is to early to tell where this case is going right now but hopefully we will have more progress. In addition two of the vehicles that we have entered into the MULES system as stolen here in Pulaski County have been located. One was found in Texas and they have a possible suspect in the case. A Pulaski County Trooper located the second stolen vehicle here in the County when he responded to a vehicle fire on I-44.

We continue to have a deputy on long term medical leave. He has used up all of his time with our department and in now drawing sick leave time from the Pulaski County employee sick leave pool. We do not know what the future holds for this Deputy.

If I failed to report that one of the last two St. Robert City Police vehicles that we were given has been completed and is now in service, then consider this the notice that this has occurred. The vehicle has been completely set up and was issued to Deputy Deputy 347, our newest Deputy. We now have two former St. Robert cars in our active fleet and we have one more to waiting for the installation of the necessary police equipment. We have not been able to find the time to work on the mobile command post vehicle. I should note that we install our own equipment so that we do not have to pay someone else to do the work. We save money but the progress is slower.

The six-month expense budget sheets have been delivered to each office holder. I find these an easy way to get some idea of how your budget is working. Simply take the six-month figure and double the total. The doubled figure usually turns out to be pretty close to the final result at the end of the year. It appears that we will be over on prisoner board, prisoner meals, and all auto expense. But I broke that news to you several months ago. When the yearly budget figure in an area such as inmate board is set to low, you will go over. Nobody has control over the cost for inmate board. You just pay the bill.

I think I better save any other remarks about the budget for next time. I seem to be close to the magic number of words for this column and I should close out this effort. I would like to remind all of you that you do need to drive careful and to please stay legal. Despite the fact we are ahead of schedule on inmate board payments for this year I bet we can find room for you at the Inn if we try. The jail lights are on!

3068
State News / Re: Branson In Top 100 Most Unsafe Cities
« on: July 21, 2007, 02:48:19 AM »
It is probably ranked on per capita, and no one lives in the city limits.


I don't get that. I worked in Branson for 4 months and all I ever seen was people over 40 scooting up and down the strip. I rarely ever seen a cop nor heard of any crime. I would guess maybe they keep it on the down low for tourists.

3069
Sports Opinion / Nike pulls Michael Vicks Shoe Deal.
« on: July 20, 2007, 02:17:07 PM »
Glad to hear it. Nike after many years of being cruel to its factory workers, and retailers, has decided to take a stand against animal cruelty. LOL

3070
Local News / Elbow Bridge, Kudos to Farnham.
« on: July 20, 2007, 05:55:48 AM »
MoDOT could save Devil’s Elbow bridge, straighten GW Lane route

Published: Tuesday, July 17, 2007 Daily Guide
 
 
Darrell Todd Maurina Daily Guide

While high fuel prices are rapidly driving up the cost of road maintenance in Pulaski County, commissioners were glad to hear Monday morning that Commissioner Bill Farnham appears to have succeeded in obtaining approval from the Missouri Department of Transportation’s District 9 region for repairing the historic Devil’s Elbow Bridge.

State financing is only one $250,000 piece of a multi-part financing package totaling $1.46 million that, if successful, would reopen the Devil’s Elbow Bridge to tour bus traffic, prevent further bridge deterioration, and make it possible for drivers to continue traveling the original route of Historic Route 66.

 
Farnham said he was pleasantly surprised after an initial evaluation that wasn’t so positive.

“We were about the lowest-ranked project going in there, but after a 20-minute presentation by (a project engineer) and myself, we walked out feeling pretty good. And about 4 p.m. we got the word that they voted to award us the money,” Farnham said. “(Photos of another bridge rehabilitation project) looked nice and shiny silver, brand-spanking new, and that’s what this bridge will look like after it’s rehabbed. And they’ll be able to raise the weight limit on it so tourist buses can go through.”

3071
Pulaski Enquirer / Re: The Good Old Days
« on: July 20, 2007, 01:44:14 AM »
I always liked the mohair type gal..


I REMEMBER!  I also remember financially better off girls wore angora sweaters, those not so well off wore mohair.  (Like me)

3072
Sneak Peek Sheriff's View / Re: Sneak Peek Sheriff's View
« on: July 16, 2007, 05:45:37 PM »




The Sheriff’s View #29, Week of July 16, to 20, 2007


Welcome aboard for another column. This column will be very interesting to write on my part. As you may recall in last weeks column I referred to “special circumstances” in the writing of that column. The special circumstances were quite simple; I have been in Canada and Alaska since July 4th.  My family and I got back on Friday the 13th. They are in one piece, but I am missing a tooth. And I have a massive head and chest cold. And while Delta Airline delivered my sick body to St. Louis my luggage went to Atlanta, Georgia. Other than that it was a great trip. I had heard stories in the past about the size and number of mosquitoes in Alaska and all I can say is they are not telling tall tales. They are big and they have lots of kinfolk on the wing in Alaska.

So I must confess that last week’s column was written in advance. My Chief Deputy Capt. Tom Cristoffer, briefed me yesterday on the events of this past week that I was absent. In a nutshell Tom said that while the Sheriff was away the bad guy mice did not come out to play. Tom reports about the usual number of alarms, domestics and other calls. Nothing big or unusual occurred. The trick this week will be to write a worthy column about events that occurred while I was gone.

I would like to start with the calls for service/case number report. As of late Sunday afternoon the 15th, we stood at 4,546. The number two weeks ago was 4,133. So we gained a total of 413 calls in these two weeks. We expect such a gain during the summer months. This is our active season and people are out moving around with many varied reasons for the movement. Many times these outings end in legal trouble and give us work.

Our newest Deputy, Deputy 347, has completed training and is now out on his own. We still have one Deputy out on long term medical leave and we have no idea how long that will continue. We would like to get him back. We are tired of working at less than full strength. Our Deputy per 1,000-population base is not adequate in the first place and even the loss of a Deputy on vacation hurts us for the week or two weeks they are gone. When you consider the number of Deputies we have had out this year for long periods related to medical reasons we have been behind the curve all year.

Capt. Cristoffer tells me that all of our vehicles are pretty well in good shape right now. We have one Deputy going on vacation this next week and his car will go in the shop for repairs while he is gone. It is a simple but sad fact of life that when your vehicle fleet has mileage figures over 200,000 miles, then you are going to pay extra for repairs on each unit.

Also on the car front I had hoped to be able to add a small 7-passenger minivan to our fleet for use as a jail transport van. It makes no sense to me to take a 15-passenger large van and haul two inmates to the Fulton Department of Corrections Reception Center. But when that is the only vehicle you have available, then you use the old van and pray it does not break down again. Still for only two or so inmates this does not make sense on the gas mileage expense. I had sent out bids for a new minivan several weeks ago I got a great offer from a local dealer. However I need some help with this deal and the Board of Directors of the County Law Enforcement Restitution Fund have now promised to assist me in the near future. So before the year is over I expect to be able to complete this deal.

I had a question sent to me while I was gone and the question was why do you not use the Laclede County jail to hold our inmates? The answer to this question is that Laclede County is in another Circuit Court Judicial system. As such their jail cost for one of our inmates per day would be $10.00 higher than what we are charged at the Phelps or Miller County jail. Since Phelps and Miller are in our Judicial Circuit a different set of statutes apply, with different costs. Over the course of one full year that small change would equal $3,650.00 per inmate. The bottom line is that we cannot afford to send our inmates to the Laclede County jail.

And speaking of jails, I see where Texas County, the poorest county in the state of Missouri, just broke ground for their brand new jail. You may recall that the citizens of Texas County were asked last year to decide if they wanted a sales tax increase to pay for a new jail and its upkeep. Their answer as citizens on the vote was yes they would accept the extra tax. I have also been told that while I was gone Hickory County announced that they would place a Law Enforcement Sales Tax on the ballot for the citizens of Hickory County to consider this fall. I need to check this fact but I suspect my source will be correct.

Capt. Cristoffer tells me I have ton of calls to return when I get back to the office. I trust I will get some slack on this since I have been gone out of state. While I did enjoy my first real vacation since taking office I will admit that I am happy to be back at work. I would like to ask you all to drive careful and stay legal. I am sure we could find room for you in the jail if needed. The electric bill has been paid and the jail lights are ON!

3073
Music, Bands, Concerts? / Why do I like this song so much?
« on: July 16, 2007, 02:06:10 AM »
Why?

[youtube=425,350]0kg_KCsi6aw[/youtube]

3074
Religion Opinion / Re: L.A. archdiocese to pay $660M for abuse
« on: July 15, 2007, 03:50:13 PM »
Good to see this sanctuary for pedophiles slapped down. I am told these same things occurred right here in our little town of Waynesville. What's even more odd is that congregation invites him back to speak on occasion. He saved many boys in the early 70's, or at least that's what they used to call it. I'm glad I was a member of the Lutheran Church.

3075
World News / Marine: Beating of Iraqis became routine
« on: July 15, 2007, 02:30:41 PM »
Marine: Beating of Iraqis became routine
 


CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. - A Marine corporal testifying in a court-martial said Marines in his unit began routinely beating Iraqis after officers ordered them to "crank up the violence level."

 
Cpl. Saul H. Lopezromo testified Saturday at the murder trial of Cpl. Trent D. Thomas.

"We were told to crank up the violence level," said Lopezromo, testifying for the defense.

When a juror asked for further explanation, Lopezromo said: "We beat people, sir."

Within weeks of allegedly being scolded, seven Marines and a Navy corpsman went out late one night to find and kill a suspected insurgent in the village of Hamandiya near the Abu Ghraib prison. The Marines and corpsman were from 2nd Platoon, Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Regiment.

Lopezromo said the suspected insurgent was known to his neighbors as the "prince of jihad," and had been arrested several times and later released by the Iraqi legal system.

Unable to find him, the Marines and corpsman dragged another man from his house, fatally shot him, and then planted an AK-47 assault rifle near the body to make it appear he had been killed in a shootout, according to court testimony.

Four Marines and the corpsman, initially charged with murder in the April 2006 killing, have pleaded guilty to reduced charges and been given jail sentences ranging from 10 months to eight years. Thomas, 25, from St. Louis, pleaded guilty but withdrew his plea and is the first defendant to go to court-martial.

Lopezromo, who was not part of the squad on its late-night mission, said he saw nothing wrong with what Thomas did.

"I don't see it as an execution, sir," he told the judge. "I see it as killing the enemy."

He said Marines consider all Iraqi men part of the insurgency.

Lopezromo and two other Marines were charged in August with assaulting an Iraqi two weeks before the killing that led to charges against Thomas and the others. Charges against all three were later dropped.

Thomas' attorneys have said he suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury from his combat duty in Fallouja in 2004. They have argued that Thomas believed he was following a lawful order to get tougher with suspected insurgents.

Prosecution witnesses testified that Thomas shot the 52-year-old man at point-blank range after he had already been shot by other Marines and was lying on the ground.

Lopezromo said a procedure called "dead-checking" was routine. If Marines entered a house where a man was wounded, instead of checking to see whether he needed medical aid, they shot him to make sure he was dead, he testified.

"If somebody is worth shooting once, they're worth shooting twice," he said.

The jury is composed of three officers and six enlisted personnel, all of whom have served in Iraq. The trial was set to resume Monday.

3076
Religion Opinion / L.A. archdiocese to pay $660M for abuse
« on: July 15, 2007, 01:34:25 PM »
L.A. archdiocese to pay $660M for abuse By GILLIAN FLACCUS, Associated Press Writer
 


LOS ANGELES - Hundreds of people who claim they were abused by clergy affiliated with the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles can expect to be paid more than $1 million each in a $660 million settlement of their lawsuits. The deal, by far the largest settlement in the church's sexual abuse scandal, was reached Saturday, said Ray Boucher, the lead plaintiff's attorney.

 
The archdiocese, America's largest, and the plaintiffs were set to release a statement Sunday morning and hold a news conference Monday, he said.

An anonymous source with knowledge of the deal placed its value at $660 million, by far the largest payout in the church's sexual abuse scandal. The source spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity because the settlement had not been officially announced.

The amount, which would average a little more than $1.3 million per plaintiff, exceeded earlier reports that the settlement would be between $600 million and $650 million.

Some Roman Catholic orders — the Servites, Claretians and Oblates — will be carved out of the agreement because they refused to participate, the source said. The settlement also calls for the release of confidential priest personnel files after review by a judge assigned to oversee the litigation, Boucher said.

The settlements push the total amount paid out by the U.S. church since 1950 to more than $2 billion, with about a quarter of that coming from the Los Angeles archdiocese.

It wasn't immediately clear how the payout would be split among the insurers, the archdiocese and several Roman Catholic religious orders. A judge must sign off on the agreement.

The release of the priest documents was important to the agreement, Boucher said, because it could reveal whether archdiocesan leaders were involved in covering up for abusive priests.

"Transparency is a critical part of this and of all resolutions," he said.

Tod Tamberg, a spokesman for the archdiocese, did not immediately return a call seeking comment late Saturday. Previously, he said the church would be in court on Monday.

Plaintiff Steven Sanchez, who was expected to testify in the first trial, said he was simultaneously relieved and disappointed. He sued the archdiocese claiming abuse by the late Rev. Clinton Hagenbach, who died in 1987.

"I was really emotionally ready to take on the archdiocese in court in less than 48 hours, but I'm glad all victims are going to be compensated," he said. "I hope all victims will find some type of healing in this process."

The settlement is the largest ever by a Roman Catholic diocese since the clergy sexual abuse scandal erupted in Boston in 2002. The largest payout so far has been by the Diocese of Orange, Calif., in 2004, for $100 million.

Facing a flood of abuse claims, five dioceses — Tucson, Ariz.; Spokane, Wash.; Portland, Ore.; Davenport, Iowa, and San Diego — sought bankruptcy protection.

The Los Angeles archdiocese, its insurers and various Roman Catholic orders have paid more than $114 million to settle 86 claims so far. The largest of those came in December, when the archdiocese reached a $60 million settlement with 45 people whose claims dated from before the mid-1950s and after 1987 — periods when it had little or no sexual abuse insurance.

Several religious orders in California have also reached multimillion-dollar settlements in recent months, including the Carmelites, the Franciscans and the Jesuits.

However, more than 500 other lawsuits against the archdiocese had remained unresolved despite years of legal wrangling. Most of the outstanding lawsuits were generated by a 2002 state law that revoked for one year the statute of limitations for reporting sexual abuse.

Cardinal Roger Mahony recently told parishioners in an open letter that the archdiocese was selling its high-rise administrative building and considering the sale of about 50 other nonessential church properties to raise funds for a settlement.

A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge overseeing the cases recently ruled that Mahony could be called to testify in the second trial on schedule, and attorneys for plaintiffs wanted to call him in many more.

The same judge also cleared the way for four people to seek punitive damages — something that could have opened the church to tens of millions of dollars in payouts if the ruling had been expanded to other cases.S. church since 1950 to more than $2 billion, with about a quarter of that coming from the Los Angeles archdiocese.

It wasn't immediately clear how the payout would be split among the insurers, the archdiocese and several Roman Catholic religious orders. A judge must sign off on the agreement.

The release of the priest documents was important to the agreement, Boucher said, because it could reveal whether archdiocesan leaders were involved in covering up for abusive priests.

"Transparency is a critical part of this and of all resolutions," he said.

Tod Tamberg, a spokesman for the archdiocese, did not immediately return a call seeking comment late Saturday. Previously, he said the church would be in court on Monday.

Plaintiff Steven Sanchez, who was expected to testify in the first trial, said he was simultaneously relieved and disappointed. He sued the archdiocese claiming abuse by the late Rev. Clinton Hagenbach, who died in 1987.

"I was really emotionally ready to take on the archdiocese in court in less than 48 hours, but I'm glad all victims are going to be compensated," he said. "I hope all victims will find some type of healing in this process."

The settlement is the largest ever by a Roman Catholic diocese since the clergy sexual abuse scandal erupted in Boston in 2002. The largest payout so far has been by the Diocese of Orange, Calif., in 2004, for $100 million.

Facing a flood of abuse claims, five dioceses — Tucson, Ariz.; Spokane, Wash.; Portland, Ore.; Davenport, Iowa, and San Diego — sought bankruptcy protection.

The Los Angeles archdiocese, its insurers and various Roman Catholic orders have paid more than $114 million to settle 86 claims so far. The largest of those came in December, when the archdiocese reached a $60 million settlement with 45 people whose claims dated from before the mid-1950s and after 1987 — periods when it had little or no sexual abuse insurance.

Several religious orders in California have also reached multimillion-dollar settlements in recent months, including the Carmelites, the Franciscans and the Jesuits.

However, more than 500 other lawsuits against the archdiocese had remained unresolved despite years of legal wrangling. Most of the outstanding lawsuits were generated by a 2002 state law that revoked for one year the statute of limitations for reporting sexual abuse.

Cardinal Roger Mahony recently told parishioners in an open letter that the archdiocese was selling its high-rise administrative building and considering the sale of about 50 other nonessential church properties to raise funds for a settlement.

A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge overseeing the cases recently ruled that Mahony could be called to testify in the second trial on schedule, and attorneys for plaintiffs wanted to call him in many more.

The same judge also cleared the way for four people to seek punitive damages — something that could have opened the church to tens of millions of dollars in payouts if the ruling had been expanded to other cases.


3077
Local News / Re: CHEATING THE COUNTY
« on: July 15, 2007, 01:25:01 PM »
Dont know this for a fact, but I think Larry Southard is running for western district commissioner.


See Yankee Trader; everyone wants to gripe, but noone wants to step up to the plate and take over.  May as well put this thread to bed Rick.  That's about as far as this kind of things ever goes.

3078
Business Opinion / Re: Do you think I got ripped off?
« on: July 15, 2007, 12:28:38 AM »
Drums can't be put on backwards, Period..

I am not mentioning the name of the business because I have no proof, but here's my story and I'm sticking to it.

In October 2006 I took my car in to get new brake drums on the rear.  The next day I took it back to the repair shop and told the mechanic it was still making a screaching noise.  He said "its just the way they make the drums now.  He has a new pick up and it squeals all the time."  So I drove the car for a few more months and one day dropped it off at his shop to have him drive it to see what he thought.  Again, he said he couldn't find anything wrong.  The noise got worse, it would even squeal while i was driving not just when stopping.  So I took it back to him last week.  He called me at work and told me a hose has a small leak in it and it was spraying whatever it was onto the brake so he order two new ones from the local auto supply and it would be $120.00 to fix it.  I said OK.  When the driver guy came to pick me up at work, I said "so you got it fixed huh"  he said, "yeah the drums were put on backwards"  I'm thinking good because they put them on so if they put them on it should be covered under warranty or something, right?  When I got to the shop I asked the owner/mechanic about what the guy told me.  He said "Oh he's just a gofer, we lie to him all the time and play tricks on him."  What do you think?  I think they put the things on wrong and charged me to fix it.

3079
Local News / Re: CHEATING THE COUNTY
« on: July 14, 2007, 02:40:59 AM »
Just struck me that the good guys - the ones on the side of the people and not their personal gain - like this site; seems the bad guys don't. I guess it's having its desired effect, just the original plan in action for me. The good thing about this page is that it can expose corruption, and it's also a good forum to correct false allegations. Rumors do run rampant in communities, and I can attest that this site has quelled many a falsehood. Herein lies an opportunity to correct another one, if it so be.


.
You are very right! Now lets see if they respond... or not. I would like to know because it isnt fair at all especially with our sheriffs department low on funds.

3080
Local News / Re: CHEATING THE COUNTY
« on: July 13, 2007, 09:18:47 PM »
Thanks for the kudos. I do not know whether this is true or not, but the rumors have ran rampant about similar matters for years, and it needs to be addressed one way or another. I have heard similar allegations from another person who claimed to work on their crews at one time. If it is true, then our tax dollars should have better watch dogs in charge. If I were commissioner and read this, I would look into it immediately and report the findings immediately, in a public venue. Now we wait to see if we all deserve any response from those in power. My guess it will be ignored, and from that you can all get your opinions or conclusions..

If it were me, and I was innocent, I would prove it right here right now. If I were guilty I would ignore it and hope it goes away (Then again if it were me I'd be innocent because I wouldn't treat the tax payers money that way.)

Remember it's an election year coming up, and these rumors will only get worse if not addressed.


Kudos for keeping the thread Rick!!

3081
Local News / Re: CHEATING THE COUNTY
« on: July 13, 2007, 05:09:30 AM »
They work for us, so, I think they have a different standard than the rest of the general public. That is why this thread stays, and others go. They have the opportunity to defend this accusation right here, and right now if it is a false accusation. They are aware of it I'd bet.


Thats kinda what I was thinking. Bad Move to air out dirty laundry on a public forum.

3082
Restaurant Opinion / Re: Stefano's
« on: July 11, 2007, 07:29:23 PM »
Stephan has decided to stay here, and keep running the Restaurant..

3083
Local News / Against The Grain guitarist home burns down.
« on: July 09, 2007, 05:35:41 AM »
Today, Ron Foster (ATG lead guitarist) had his home burn down. Please keep Ron, and his family in your prayers in the days to come.

As always, when one of our brothers have tragedy strike, it effects us all. We wish to send all of our prayers and thoughts to Ron during this difficult time.

Watch their site ( http://www.myspace.com/atgrocks  ), for news on an upcoming benefit. (If your in a band and would be interested in playing at the benefit please let them know).

3084
Still no response. LOL The truth hurts don't it?

3085
Emergency Services Opinion / Re: Chest presses, not breaths, help CPR
« on: July 07, 2007, 06:16:37 AM »
Hmmmmmmmm, guess no one cares around here. LOL

3086
Sneak Peek Sheriff's View / Re: Sneak Peek Sheriff's View
« on: July 07, 2007, 05:39:30 AM »
The Sheriff’s View #28, Week of July 9 to 13, 2007

Welcome aboard one more time. This will be a special column due to some unusual circumstances. I have several topics to write about this week. I would like to start with a comment on the inmate count for our jail. The count had dropped for a short time and has now climbed back into the high sixty numbers. We even hit 70 one day this week. While the lower count means less money the County spends on a daily basis to house the inmates out of county, the higher count signals more bad guys being captured. Which one is better? I suspect that question might stir up a debate.

During this years budget hearings the statement was made to me that the CLERF fund (County Law Enforcement Fund) was my fund and was for my use. At the time I disagreed with that statement and I still disagree with that statement. I would like to report that so far this year the Sheriff’s Department has received zero money from the fund. The Prosecutor ‘s office has received about $7,700.00 from the fund. I currently have a request into the Board of Directors for $5,000.00 to help me buy a new jail van and in the near future I hope to see some action on this request.

Now before anyone gets the idea that I have a case of sour grapes against the PA for her use of the CLERF fund, please understand that the PA and I had a long discussion on this issue. I know exactly why she requested these funds. I must also say that in this case I think her need was greater than our need at the Sheriff’s Department. The PA’s office has also been under funded for several years at budget time. It is a simple fact of life but the faster and more efficiently the PA’s office can work the greater the positive impact on the Sheriff’s Department. Cases are disposed of quicker, less jail time for inmates, and faster closure for victims. The deputies are also happier to see positive results for their work. My only gripe about all of this is that the CLERF fund is not large enough to supply both of us with ample money.

The dispatch statistics for the month of June are now available. We had a grand total of 6,220 telephone calls for June. That brings the first half of 2007 up to 30,838 phone calls answered by dispatch. The front window also had a bumper crop of visitors. A total of 2,133 people visited the front window for June. And that brings the year’s total up to 9,521. Dispatch also logged 71 animal calls in June, which made the year’s total 180. The dispatch crew also snagged a total of 9 warrant arrests. That brings the arrest total for dispatch up to 14 for the year. I think that is a lot of work for our small dispatch crew. Well done to the Ladies and our one Gentleman in dispatch.

I would also like to report on another crew of people who work for us and that is the members of our reserve detective unit. From 1-1-07 to 6-1-07 these Deputies logged in 1,563 working hours without pay. The top Detective has logged in 465 hours this year. Since all we expend on them is some money for specialized equipment and a few tanks of gasoline I think we are receiving one very large return on our money with this crew. They are available for drug work including K-9 searches. We call them out for serious crimes against people and property and they do a lot of other investigative work that you do not hear about.

Well in a nutshell I have decided that yes, you should hear about the unit. We get a very big bang for mere pennies from these guys so the time has come to bring the unit into the public light. There is no way I can tell you about them in a column and do justice to their exploits so the only thing left to do is a special feature article on them for the local papers. Sometime in the near future we shall get that job done and submitted to the press. I believe that you will enjoy the article. You will also be amazed at the caliber of these men and the background experience they bring to Pulaski County.

Before I close for this week I must pass on one story. On Monday, July 2, we received a report of a male subject who was going to kill himself with a weapon. The Sheriff’s Department, MSHP, and Waynesville Police all began to hunt for the subject. One of our Deputies responded to his residence near Richland and since a weapon had been mentioned, the Deputy decided to sneak up on the house with a large degree of stealth. And promptly found that his “stealthy” approach had taken him right into the subject’s marihuana patch. Oops!

A few minutes later a Missouri State Highway Patrol Trooper stopped the subject about a mile from his home and he was able to secure the subject without injury. So our Deputies responded to that scene to have a little chat about the “patch”. And once again we have lived up to our old saying that you never quite know what is going to happen next around here. Please drive careful and stay legal, the jail lights are on!

3087
Restaurant Opinion / Re: Miller's Grill
« on: July 07, 2007, 05:10:35 AM »
5

The Bird, what is your scale?  2.8 out of . . .

3088
Restaurant Opinion / Re: Miller's Grill
« on: July 06, 2007, 11:16:11 PM »
I had the appetizer sampler, and it was good, the hot wings were great. The food was OK, the salad was edible, no thrill there. Another time I had the Porter House steak and it was OK.  Broccoli was cooked (Some places serve it undercooked or cold.), toast was just OK. No big deal, don't think I will go out of my way to eat there a third time. Mylisa had Chicken Parmesan and liked it. My first meal was ribs and they were again just OK. Not one thing, other than hot wings stood out as being great (Similar to the way Dominoes makes them, maybe more hot sauce.) Service was very good I might add. Was seated immediately in smoking section, non smoking was a wait. Very roomy inside the building, unlike Rubys.

2.8 stars.

3089
Tell us your favorite Joke / Why I Fired My Secretary- a man's story
« on: July 06, 2007, 05:26:55 AM »
Why I Fired My Secretary- a man's story

Two weeks ago, was my forty-fifth birthday, and I wasn't feeling too hot that morning anyway.

I went into breakfast, knowing my wife would be pleasant and say Happy Birthday and probably have a present for me.

She didn't even say Good Morning, let alone any Happy Birthday. I said, well, that's wives for you. The children will remember. The children came into breakfast and didn't say a word.

When I started to the office I was feeling pretty low and despondent. As I walked into my office, my secretary Janet said, "Good Morning, Boss, Happy Birthday." And I felt a little better; someone had remembered.

I worked until noon. About noon Janet knocked on my door and said, "You know it's such a beautiful day outside and it's your birthday, let's go to lunch, just you and me."

I said, "By George, that's the greatest thing I've heard all day. Let's go."

We went to lunch. We didn't go where we normally go; we went out into the country to a little private place. We had two martinis and enjoyed lunch tremendously.

On the way back to the office, she said, "You know, it's such a beautiful day. We don't need to go back to the office. Do we?"

I said, "No, I guess not."

She said, "Let's go to my apartment."

After arriving at her apartment, we had another martini and smoked a cigarette and she said, "Boss, if you don't mind, I think I'll go into the bedroom and slip into something more comfortable."

"Sure," I excitedly replied. She went into the bedroom and in about six minutes, she came out... ... carrying a big birthday cake, followed by my wife and children. All were singing Happy Birthday.

... and there on the couch I sat... ... with nothing on but my socks...

… and *that's* why I fired my secretary

3090
Sneak Peek Sheriff's View / Re: Sneak Peek Sheriff's View
« on: July 01, 2007, 04:37:14 AM »
The Sheriff’s View #27, Week of July 2 to 6, 2007

Welcome aboard one more time. We had a long, hard, and busy week I will start this column with the calls for service/case number count for this week. The number as of 3:46pm on 6-30-2007 stands at 4,133. That means we picked up 175 cases this past week or business as usual.

We had a milestone this past week. On the 27th Deputy Scott Dumas celebrated his 30th anniversary with the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department. We held a small party in the back office with a decorated cake. Some of the employees were uncertain as to how they should try to get Scott to the office at the correct time so we cheated. I had dispatch deliver a message to him to report to the Boss’s office at the appointed time and we briefly discussed some problems with paper service. Then Scott was told there was someone at the front window to be served a paper and he walked into dispatch to serve the paper and was promptly blindsided with a cake. I believe I can say that we did surprise him. The effort needed to work 30 years anywhere is quite hard but to work for our department for that long requires a special person. Well Done Scott Dumas!

The major news for this week was our service of a federal arrest warrant on a suspect in the Swedeborg area. The warrant was for federal weapons violations. Our background information in this case led us to believe this would be a high-risk warrant service. So we took our time and assembled some heavy force to assist with the arrest. After many hours of effort we did serve the warrant. Once we had the scene under control we found that our fears had been justified and the suspect did have some heavy firepower at his disposal. We observed other firearms and drug related items in plain view. So we closed up the residence, left a Deputy to guard it all night and notified the ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms) to apply for a federal search warrant.

The ATF did ask for a search warrant, which was later signed by the Federal Magistrate. At 11:00am the next morning the ATF agents served the warrant on the house with me looking over their shoulder. The federal agents seized a large number of items that I am sure will lead to additional charges at a later date. This was a very good case to make and it required a lot of hard work. You will recall in my last column where I had mentioned our Deputies were training with the St. Robert City JETT team on SWAT tactics. We trained on Sunday and used the training for real on Tuesday/Wednesday. I would like to thank the members of the JETT team along with the two Missouri State Highway Patrol Troopers who assisted us during this arrest. Gentlemen, I would like to say, job well done and thank you for the hard work.

And speaking of training we held another session for the jail staff and road Deputies at the Waynesville Rural Fire Station this past week. This session covered a number of topics including the use of pepper spray. I believe the Daily Guide reporter who had been at the firehouse to cover another story stayed over and covered this one as well. The end result was a front-page news story and a photo of one of our officers who had just been sprayed. As I said in last week’s column we are trying to bring up the level of training and we will have more classes in the future.

This past week our full time detective has been joined by a railroad Detective from the BNSF railroad. They are looking into several cases were the railroad lost property or had damage to signal lights. I believe they have done well this week and have managed to solve several crimes.

On Monday members of the POST group presented me with a check for $2,471.07, which represented the proceeds from the POST golf tournament at Dixon a few weeks ago. At the same meeting a private citizen presented me with $242.80 that had been collected in some donation cans around the community. All of this money will go into the special equipment fund and will be used to purchase repeater radio systems to add to our Patrol cars. I would like to thank all of you who helped to raise the money or those who gave up their funds to help us out. With the help of fine citizens like you we will be able to bring our department’s equipment list up to where it should be and make the working conditions for our Deputies much safer. Thank You.

On June 16th the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department held a special proactive criminal saturation patrol in the county. I had announced to the media that we would do this before the date selected. Since then a number of citizens have contacted me and expressed the opinion that it was not necessary to make such and announcement and they hoped that next time we would not tip off our saturation. I believe that I shall honor their wish for the next operation.

This past week has been national kidnap a person week here in Pulaski County. On Friday we were given a parental kidnap case that occurred here in Pulaski County. We managed to locate the child and suspect at a residence in Killeen, Texas, and the police there did the rest. The child was recovered and the parent is being held on a Pulaski County warrant.

Also on Friday, we received a report of a parental kidnap case that had occurred in the state of New York and the child and suspect were thought to be located here in Pulaski County. We were able to find these folks. The child has been recovered and the parent taken into custody.

On Saturday afternoon as I typed this column we were working another kidnap case. This was an adult who was reported to have been taken away against her will on Rt. Y. Within the past few minutes we have learned that the Conway, Missouri, Police Department has this person in their patrol car. We are not sure just how that happened or at this point even if this was a valid kidnap case. This one will take time to sort out. We have called out one of our reserve detectives who in now headed to Conway to make contact with the victim.

And there you have it, another thrilling, chilling, and informative column. As usual I would like to close out for this week with my special request for all of you to drive safe and to stay legal. The jail does have room for your body and the lights are ON!